Skip to main content

Roofing company in Atlantic Beach, SC

Request a Free Estimate

 Roof Replacement Atlantic Beach, SC

What Clients Say About Us

When you choose Lowco Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the very best:

Experience

Lowco Roofing is a family-owned and operated business with over 30 years of roofing experience. There's no roofing project too small or large for our team to handle. We've seen and done it all, from major roof replacements to preventative roofing maintenance. When combined with our customer service, material selection, and available warranties, our experience sets us apart from other roofing contractors.

Reputation

Lowco Roofing has earned the respect and admiration of our customers by delivering the best craftsmanship and overall customer satisfaction. Our team is happy to assist you with any questions you have. Whether you need a roof inspection for your new home or have questions about roofing shingles, we're here to serve you.

Selection

From shingles, metal, and tile to commercial flat roofing, Lowco Roofing has the product lines and expertise to complete your job correctly, on time, and within your budget. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, we offer the largest selection of shingle styles and products from the most trusted name in shingle manufacturers.

Warranty Coverage

As roofing experts, we know that warranties are important to our customers. That's why we offer the best product warranties around, including lifetime warranties on our shingles. With these warranties in place, you can have peace of mind knowing that your roof protects what matters most in your life.

End Heading

The benefits of Lowco roof installations include:

It might seem obvious, but replacing an old roof is a safe, responsible decision for your family. This is especially true if you know for sure that your current roof is in bad shape.

Safety

Be the envy of your neighborhood! Replacing your old which makes your home look great and can increase the value of your property when it's time to sell.

Enhanced Curb Appeal

Installing a new roof is often a more energy-efficient option than keeping your old one. As a bonus, many homeowners enjoy lower utility and energy bills when replacing their roofs.

Energy Efficient

Because Lowco Roofing uses top-quality roofing materials and shingles from Owens Corning, you can be confident your roof will last for years.

Long-Lasting

There are many reasons why you might want to consider replacing your roof, but most often, the choice stems from necessity. But how do you know when it's time to replace instead of repair?

End Heading

Let Us Show You the Lowco Difference

There's a reason why so many South Carolina homeowners turn to Lowco for roofing services. Sure, we could talk about our accolades and how we're better than other roofing companies. But the truth is, we'd prefer to show you with hard work and fair pricing.

From roof repairs to roof replacement, there's no better company to trust than Lowco Roofing. We have the expertise, experience, products, and tools to get the job done right, no matter your roofing problem. We'll work with you to select the best materials for your roofing needs and budget, and we'll make sure the job is done right from start to finish.

24-7

CALL US NOW

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-937-2040

Free Consultation

Latest News in Atlantic Beach, SC

Atlantic Beach Town Council appoints new election commissioner amid mayoral election battle

ATLANTIC BEACH, S.C. (WMBF) - The Atlantic Beach Town Council voted to appoint a new chairman to the election commission after former chairman Joe Montgomery was voted out.Derrick Stevens, the town’s planning commissioner, was voted in to take the vacant seat, but, not all parties are happy with this decision.“Unethical, illegal. The lines are blurred and crossed,” said mayoral candidate John David.David argued the vote was illegal because there wasn’t a quorum.Mayor pro tem and David&rsquo...

ATLANTIC BEACH, S.C. (WMBF) - The Atlantic Beach Town Council voted to appoint a new chairman to the election commission after former chairman Joe Montgomery was voted out.

Derrick Stevens, the town’s planning commissioner, was voted in to take the vacant seat, but, not all parties are happy with this decision.

“Unethical, illegal. The lines are blurred and crossed,” said mayoral candidate John David.

David argued the vote was illegal because there wasn’t a quorum.

Mayor pro tem and David’s mayoral opponent, Josephine Isom, recused herself from the vote, and councilmember Edward Campbell wasn’t present. It left only Mayor Jake Evans and Councilwoman Jacqui Gore to vote on the appointment. But, town attorney Joseph Dickey said the vote was legal.

“You had three out of five members at the meeting, that was a quorum, otherwise the meeting would not have taken place,” said Dickey. “Once someone recuses his or herself, that doesn’t make there not be a quorum.”

David also argues Stevens’ appointment is unethical because he is Councilwoman Gore’s live-in boyfriend. He also pointed out Gore’s mother already sits on the election commission.

“You can put people anywhere you want to, but how is it when someone is making a decision on voting, on the counting of votes, and you have both of those people in your household or immediate household?” said David.

But, Dickey also countered this point, saying it’s somewhat inevitable in a small town.

“If you go back and look at the town of Atlantic Beach’s history, you have people that have served as sister and brother and have been mayor and council before, and there have been other family members that have served in various positions on the council,” said Dickey.

As for certifying the mayoral election results, Dickey said he has reached out beyond Atlantic Beach to get advice on the town’s situation.

“Out of ethical and legal concern and an abundance of caution, we felt it was prudent to contact local and federal law enforcement to at least request a review of things and just out of protection of the town and town officials,” said Dickey.

WMBF News reached out to Derrick Stevens, who said he has no comment.

A timeline of when certification may happen is unclear.

Copyright 2023 WMBF. All rights reserved.

New leadership at the top is headed to Atlantic Beach as historically Black town defines future

Atlantic Beach voters will have big decisions to make at next month’s polls as they opt for a new mayor and flip the council by at least one new member on the panel.Those officials are set to talk about how to handle growth and development issues in the historically Black town sandwiched in North Myrtle Beach.Mayoral candidate Josephine Isom and council candidates Jacqui Gore, Shaun Swinson and Carla Taylor did not reply to the The Sun News’ questionnaire.John David Jr. is running for mayor and Jerry Leo Finn...

Atlantic Beach voters will have big decisions to make at next month’s polls as they opt for a new mayor and flip the council by at least one new member on the panel.

Those officials are set to talk about how to handle growth and development issues in the historically Black town sandwiched in North Myrtle Beach.

Mayoral candidate Josephine Isom and council candidates Jacqui Gore, Shaun Swinson and Carla Taylor did not reply to the The Sun News’ questionnaire.

John David Jr. is running for mayor and Jerry Leo Finney is seeking a council seat.

Swinson, convicted of felony drug charges in Virginia, spent 72 months in prison.

Some answers have been edited for length.

Q: Is the proposed $100 million condotel project that is now the subject of a lawsuit a good fit for the town? Why or why not?

A: The current hotel and condo development project plan is NOT a responsible development for Atlantic Beach. Atlantic Beach is a historical and cultural treasure.The project poses challenges to the community infrastructure, the natural habitat along the shore, traffic congestion in the town and most of all preservation of our historical structures. We must protect our natural habitats, maintain public beach access, and consider the impact on our local infrastructure and ecosystems.

Q: Are you in favor of connecting Atlantic Beach to North Myrtle Beach or Horry County?

A: I am not in favor of the newly proposed Wiley or Madison connectors. This project will immediately bring new and increased traffic into the town. This new road will overload the current very small single lane road, and if expansion is required to support the projected traffic volumes the construction will displace many of our long-time residents in Atlantic Beach and North Myrtle Beach.

Q: How can Atlantic Beach remain economically viable over the next decade?

A: Our history is rich, and the community is working hard to document and preserve this history. In addition to the historic preservation grants that the Town has received, we are also focused on reasonable and responsible growth. Atlantic Beach can remain economically viable by capitalizing on the current growth and development along with creating a forward-looking plan to support our community.

Q: Should Atlantic Beach consider outsourcing any more of its services to North Myrtle Beach or Horry County?

A: Atlantic Beach has the right balance of utilization of services currently.

Q: Is the proposed $100 million “condotel” project that is now the subject of a lawsuit a good fit for the town? Why or why not?

A: I do not support the development of the 21-story condotel. Atlantic Beach currently faces one of the highest tax rates in Horry County. To address this, we must rethink our approach to finances. Exploring new revenue sources can have an immediate impact. Our focus for Main Street should be on quality, low-scale developments that enhance the community’s character and provide enjoyable experiences for our residents and visitors. As a lawyer, I support the 1930s deed restrictions limiting oceanfront development to residential construction. I believe in upholding these restrictions and following the law as written. Any ordinances rooted in misinformation should be eliminated. Together, we can improve our town.

Q: Are you in favor of connecting Atlantic Beach to North Myrtle Beach or Horry County?

A: No, I am not in favor of connecting Atlantic Beach to North Myrtle Beach with the newly proposed Wiley or Madison Connectors as recommended by the Grand Strand Area Transportation Study. I would internally assess Atlantic Beach’s road infrastructure and collaborate with the council to address town needs, aiming to enhance our community without introducing unnecessary traffic from external connections.

Q: How can Atlantic Beach remain economically viable over the next decade?

A: Atlantic Beach’s greatest asset is the people of Atlantic Beach. Atlantic Beach continues to attract families and business people who are looking for a quality of life that has long since disappeared in the neighboring cities in order to enjoy a slower, more serene community with less traffic. Atlantic Beach enjoys an escape from the hustle and bustle of the Grand Strand to the north and south. Growth is occurring in Atlantic Beach with no inducements, incentives, grants, or abatements – and without revenues from high-rise condos. Atlantic Beach property values are rising. One result of revitalizing the existing community is the steady increase in demand and the rising sale prices of vacant land.

Q: Should Atlantic Beach consider outsourcing any more of its services to North Myrtle Beach or Horry County?

A: Currently, I do not think Atlantic Beach should consider outsourcing any more of its services to North Myrtle Beach or Horry County.

Atlantic Beach residents up in arms over nearly approved condotel

ATLANTIC BEACH, SC (WMBF) - Some Atlantic Beach residents are fighting a proposal to reshape the skyline of the historic four-block town.The streets and yards of Atlantic Beach are scattered with signs saying, “No High Rises,” as a proposal for a 21-story condotel is one vote away from approval. A condotel combines short-term living units like a hotel and ownership units like a condo.The Atlantic Beach Town Council will soon take a final vote to rezone land for the $80 million project.The proposed high rise w...

ATLANTIC BEACH, SC (WMBF) - Some Atlantic Beach residents are fighting a proposal to reshape the skyline of the historic four-block town.

The streets and yards of Atlantic Beach are scattered with signs saying, “No High Rises,” as a proposal for a 21-story condotel is one vote away from approval. A condotel combines short-term living units like a hotel and ownership units like a condo.

The Atlantic Beach Town Council will soon take a final vote to rezone land for the $80 million project.

The proposed high rise would include 168 hotel rooms, 36 short-term rental units, 24 condo units and an 11-story parking garage.

Residents who are against the idea are signing a petition to put a stop to it.

Atlantic Beach resident Poterressia McNeil-Dolphin said she has lived on Atlantic Beach for 20 years, and a high rise does not reflect what the town wants.

“It’s going to choke the life out of this little town,” McNeil-Dolphin said. “It will never ever be why we are all here. A very peaceful, quiet place. The gas fumes, the noise, the traffic in a four-block town. We have people in the council who are pushing to do this, and this is something I’m sure will destroy the town.”

However, Atlantic Beach Councilwoman Jacqueline Gore said a condotel is exactly what the town needs.

“Economical growth. Infrastructure. Our town would just be beautiful; it’s what we need,” Gore said. “We want to be into the new age as well as everybody else.”

Atlantic Beach residents Jerry and Elaine Finney said not only do they believe the town cannot support that kind of infrastructure and it would cause traffic issues, but it would ruin the very reason people choose to call the small town home.

“I think that most of the people that live here have built homes here recently because they wanted that small town feel and not want big high rises,” Finney said. “If they wanted that they would’ve gone further north to North Myrtle Beach or further south to south Myrtle Beach.”

Resident Bobby Waller is new to the area and said he and his wife built a home on Atlantic Beach because of the unique ocean front unlike other parts of the grand strand, and are against the proposed high rise.

“When we were looking for a place on the beach, we looked from Cherry Grove all the way to Pawleys Island for lots across the road from the ocean,” Waller said. “We fell in love with Atlantic Beach. We were hoping this wouldn’t happen, and now we’re trying to fight it.”

Gore said traffic would not be an issue, and they believe the condotel would help put Atlantic Beach on the map.

The proposal is up for public hearing and a final vote on Monday, July 10.

Copyright 2023 WMBF. All rights reserved.

Atlantic Beach residents fear high-rise would spell end of historic Black town

ATLANTIC BEACH — Atlantic Beach sits at a crossroads.Its leaders want to see an oceanfront high-rise built in the northern Grand Strand town, a place that was once a haven for Black beachgoers in the segregated South but has seen its economic fortunes decline over the decades. Many residents, meanwhile, fear new development will erase the historic community. The Town Council on July 10 passed three zoning changes that relax restrictions on developers coming into town to build projects near the Atlantic Ocean.“We bel...

ATLANTIC BEACH — Atlantic Beach sits at a crossroads.

Its leaders want to see an oceanfront high-rise built in the northern Grand Strand town, a place that was once a haven for Black beachgoers in the segregated South but has seen its economic fortunes decline over the decades. Many residents, meanwhile, fear new development will erase the historic community. The Town Council on July 10 passed three zoning changes that relax restrictions on developers coming into town to build projects near the Atlantic Ocean.

“We believe this development would destroy our beachfront and forever change the cultural and historical significance of one of the last remaining oceanfront communities predominately owned and governed by African Americans,” property owner Naim Vaughan said during a July 10 public hearing where the ordinances unanimously passed, despite a packed community center in opposition.

Town officials said the ordinances are intended to encourage development that would bring in needed revenue to the community, but residents and property owners fear the measures could spell the end of the town’s character and charm. If the development is successful, they worry neighboring North Myrtle Beach will eventually consume the town.

Known as the Black Pearl, the town of nearly 300 residents sandwiched between the city limits of North Myrtle Beach was founded in 1934 by developer George Tyson.

During the segregation era, Atlantic Beach was one of the most popular vacation destinations for Black families along the East Coast — with its hotels, nightclubs, restaurants and stores where they could gather and mingle without fear of discrimination.

Later, integration resulted in the town’s search for identity and ways to keep visitor revenue on its nearly 100 acres. One idea turned out to be a popular motorcycle festival held annually on Memorial Day weekend.

The Black Pearl Cultural Heritage Festival, commonly known as Atlantic Beach Bikefest, was started in 1980 by the Flaming Knight Riders Motorcycle Club.

The town’s population has fluctuated in recent decades. From 2010-2020, Atlantic Beach lost 42 percent of its residents, at one point dropping below 200 people, according to U.S. Census data. The town then grew to 283 residents between 2020 and 2022. That was the largest growth percentage of any municipality in South Carolina during that period.

Some residents worry the town’s history would eventually vanish if a proposed 21-story oceanfront luxury hotel and condo project is built by developer Morant Properties LLC.

William Booker, president of the Association of Atlantic Beach Property Owners, said he moved to Atlantic Beach in 2005 and the topics discussed by the city at the time were not allowing condominiums to be built in the town, while not opening Ocean Boulevard to its neighbor North Myrtle Beach.

Traveling through the city of North Myrtle Beach by way of Atlantic Beach is blocked on Ocean Boulevard through barricades.

Booker asked the Town Council what changed over the years for them to consider such a proposal and warned them of what could happen in the future.

“The next thing we’ll be told is we got to open Ocean Boulevard,” Booker said. “And then there goes Atlantic Beach.”

Town Manager Benjamin Quattlebaum said that New York-based developer Charles Morant, a Georgetown County native, has not officially submitted an application to the town for the high-rise project, which would require a separate public hearing.

Morant’s proposed condotel, named “The Black Pearl of the Atlantic,” would be located near 30th Avenue South and South Ocean Boulevard, and feature 168 hotel rooms, 36 short-term rental units and 24 luxury-condo units.

The $80 million project also includes 420 parking spaces within a nearby 11-story parking garage, according to town documents.

Morant previously said the new venue could help draw more visitors, businesses and residents as well as improve the town’s “marketability” for vacationers looking to “partake in its rich Afro-Centric cultural heritage.”

The “Black Pearl” could feature a banquet hall, meeting and conference rooms, exercise rooms, indoor and outdoor pools, a spa and sauna, gift shop and dedicated space for Town Museum artifacts and memorabilia, according to town documents.

Councilwoman Jacqueline Gore said the town is missing out on revenue because Bikefest attendees stay in the hotels of nearby communities due to a lack of accommodations in Atlantic Beach.

“We want growth here. We want change,” Gore said. “We need to be able to hold onto our charter and we need infrastructure and more jobs to come here.

“I never make decisions based on what I want for me. I want it for the town and for the residents of Atlantic Beach.”

Morant claims the development will increase the town’s land and home values, create more employment opportunities and bring in at least $9 million in tax revenue.

Bashea Jenkins, a property owner in her 40s who now lives in Maryland, said her grandfather once owned an 80-acre farm in Aynor. He would drive her and family to Atlantic Beach in the back of a pickup after working for the day.

Jenkins said those trips to the Black Pearl were better than going to any amusement park across the country, even Walt Disney World.

“We can develop the Black Pearl, but it has to be with the best interests of the people who live there each and every day,” Jenkins said. “It’s not a vacation spot, it’s a community. It’s family. It’s a legacy.”

Atlantic Beach leaders clear the way for a $100 million hotel. Residents are outraged

In an historic decision almost certain to alter their town’s character, Atlantic Beach leaders on Monday approved a new rule to allow development along its prized oceanfront strip.Officials acknowledged their vote was tied to a $100 million “condotel” project proposed along 30th Ave. S. Site plans couldn’t be submitted without the necessary zone change.Depending on perspective, the 21-story hi...

In an historic decision almost certain to alter their town’s character, Atlantic Beach leaders on Monday approved a new rule to allow development along its prized oceanfront strip.

Officials acknowledged their vote was tied to a $100 million “condotel” project proposed along 30th Ave. S. Site plans couldn’t be submitted without the necessary zone change.

Depending on perspective, the 21-story high rise either puts Atlantic Beach on a path toward economic prosperity or assures it will become a victim of its own ambitions, forcing an eventual merger with neighboring North Myrtle Beach.

For hundreds within the town of roughly 400 residents, it’s the latter.

“Atlantic Beach has been able to preserve something almost no other part of the Grand Strand region can even imagine: A coastline unmarred by massive hotels and high rises blocking views of the ocean,” resident Naim Vaughn said.

In February, Georgetown County native Charles Morant submitted to the town a conceptual plan for “The Black Pearl of the Atlantic,” a massive mixed-use structure boasting 168 hotel rooms and 24 luxury condominiums along with several short-term rentals.

For a town with virtually no sales tax base that runs on less than $1 million annually, proponents say The Black Pearl — a tribute to the town’s nickname — is critical to keep pace with Horry County’s ever increasing growth and popularity.

“The first time I took a seat in ‘95 my fear, my genuine fear, was, ‘what would Atlantic Beach look like at the end of my term,” said four-term Mayor Irene Armstrong, who was first elected in 1995. “I don’t want to be an old woman in a rocking chair, and Atlantic Beach’s store shelves are bare, like they are now. For over three generations, the shelves in Atlantic Beach’s stores have been bare.”

Born in the talons of Jim Crow, Atlantic Beach was established in 1934 after entrepreneur George Tyson gave the county a $2,000 down payment for development rights on 47 acres between 29th and 32nd avenues south, east of U.S. Highway 17.

Officials expected the Black businessman to default on his $10,000 balance but instead, he made enough money to purchase 49 more acres in the summer of 1941 along the highway’s west side.

With 90 acres of pristine land hugging the Atlantic shores, Tyson created a Black enclave where nightclubs, restaurants and street carnivals thrived. Its sands were lined with Black families from across the Southeast who could safely enjoy the water without fear of violating segregation laws.

In the years to follow, acts including Chubby Checker, Fats Domino, The Drifters, James Brown and Marvin Gaye would gig at venues like the Black Hawk Night Club and help give Atlantic Beach its “Black Pearl” moniker.

By 1966, Atlantic Beach had incorporated and ever since has resisted overtures to give up its identity.

Leading up to Monday’s vote, more than 70 yard signs dotted Atlantic Beach properties opposing the condotel and leading people to a website created by a group called “Supporters of the Tyson Ancestral Restrictions of the Deeds,” or STARD.

Among their fears:

Brenda Murphy, president of the state NAACP chapter, said Atlantic Beach leaders are “washing away” their town’s history by catering to potential large-scale development.

“Visit Hilton Head. Visit Charleston, South Carolina. How long do you think you will stand when that building stretches in front of all the dwellings of the people that have lived here all of their lives,” she said.

Town Manager Benjamin Quattlebaum said the zone changes approved on Monday were done with an eye toward long-term economic development. Morant’s group still has to file an application and get his project approved before any construction can start.

Morant, who didn’t attend Monday’s meeting, told The Sun News in February he expects doors to open in 2028.

“This is a landmark community, and we want to preserve that heritage and build on that heritage,” Moran told the town’s planning commission in February. “We think it’s time for Atlantic Beach to move forward. To develop. And we think this is the perfect opportunity to do that.”

This story was originally published July 10, 2023, 10:31 PM.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.