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When you choose Lowco Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the very best:

Experience

Lowco Roofing is a family-owned and operated business with over 30 years of roofing experience. There's no roofing project too small or large for our team to handle. We've seen and done it all, from major roof replacements to preventative roofing maintenance. When combined with our customer service, material selection, and available warranties, our experience sets us apart from other roofing contractors.

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Lowco Roofing has earned the respect and admiration of our customers by delivering the best craftsmanship and overall customer satisfaction. Our team is happy to assist you with any questions you have. Whether you need a roof inspection for your new home or have questions about roofing shingles, we're here to serve you.

Selection

From shingles, metal, and tile to commercial flat roofing, Lowco Roofing has the product lines and expertise to complete your job correctly, on time, and within your budget. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, we offer the largest selection of shingle styles and products from the most trusted name in shingle manufacturers.

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As roofing experts, we know that warranties are important to our customers. That's why we offer the best product warranties around, including lifetime warranties on our shingles. With these warranties in place, you can have peace of mind knowing that your roof protects what matters most in your life.

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The benefits of Lowco roof installations include:

It might seem obvious, but replacing an old roof is a safe, responsible decision for your family. This is especially true if you know for sure that your current roof is in bad shape.

Safety

Be the envy of your neighborhood! Replacing your old which makes your home look great and can increase the value of your property when it's time to sell.

Enhanced Curb Appeal

Installing a new roof is often a more energy-efficient option than keeping your old one. As a bonus, many homeowners enjoy lower utility and energy bills when replacing their roofs.

Energy Efficient

Because Lowco Roofing uses top-quality roofing materials and shingles from Owens Corning, you can be confident your roof will last for years.

Long-Lasting

There are many reasons why you might want to consider replacing your roof, but most often, the choice stems from necessity. But how do you know when it's time to replace instead of repair?

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Let Us Show You the Lowco Difference

There's a reason why so many South Carolina homeowners turn to Lowco for roofing services. Sure, we could talk about our accolades and how we're better than other roofing companies. But the truth is, we'd prefer to show you with hard work and fair pricing.

From roof repairs to roof replacement, there's no better company to trust than Lowco Roofing. We have the expertise, experience, products, and tools to get the job done right, no matter your roofing problem. We'll work with you to select the best materials for your roofing needs and budget, and we'll make sure the job is done right from start to finish.

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Latest News in Forestbrook, SC

New development off Forestbrook Road causing concerns

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - A new development off Forestbrook Road is causing concerns for people who live nearby.Part of Forestbrook Estates is already complete, but additional construction behind the new homes is underway.Once finished, 623 homes will sit on the land.This isn’t welcome news for many of the people who have lived in the area for years. Chief among their concerns is the elimination of the trees in their backyard and the lack of privacy that comes along with that.“I moved here because it...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - A new development off Forestbrook Road is causing concerns for people who live nearby.

Part of Forestbrook Estates is already complete, but additional construction behind the new homes is underway.

Once finished, 623 homes will sit on the land.

This isn’t welcome news for many of the people who have lived in the area for years. Chief among their concerns is the elimination of the trees in their backyard and the lack of privacy that comes along with that.

“I moved here because it reminded me of being out in the country, out in the woods,” said Sam Greathead, who has called the area home for 30 years.

Coming from West Virginia, Greathead has a special appreciation for the outdoors.

“Now since they’re putting the development in, it’s going to be different,” Greathead said. “It’s not going to have the quietness of the woods like it used to have. So I’ll miss it.”

Greathead’s backyard used to be nothing but trees as far as the eye could see. Then, once crews started cutting those trees down, it become nothing but a construction zone as far as the eye can see.

Under the plans, there will be a 25-foot buffer between the already existing homes and the new ones. Fifteen feet of that is a drainage easement, while the remaining 10 feet is required landscaping. Crews will install wax myrtles every six feet on the center along their rear property lines.

In addition to the loss of the area’s aesthetics, increased traffic on Forestbrook Road is also a concern for residents.

“Forestbrook Road is going to get more and more congested,” Max Hudson said. “That’s probably going to back up traffic for a year or two.”

Development is nothing new in Horry County. It happens so frequently that some residents want to see the county stop construction temporarily.

However, someone created a different petition recently, asking for development to continue, saying construction jobs would be at risk if development were to stop.

Still, for the people who will be directly affected by the lack of privacy in Forestbrook, they are hoping the change won’t be too tough on them.

“It’s progress,” Hudson said. “Myrtle Beach is growing.”

“We’re going to see if we can adjust and get used to it before we make our mind up,” Greathead said.

Copyright 2019 WMBF. All rights reserved.

Planning Commission approves nearly 900 unit development along Forestbrook Rd.

CONWAY, S.C. (WPDE) — In a week where the county was handed litigation over development approvals, several projects made it through both County Council and Planning Commission meetings.Thursday a major development passed through the Horry County Planning Commission that could bring hundreds of homes to Forestbrook. Board members agreed to let the County Council review the nearly 900 unit development of land between Highway 31, Highway 544 and connecting to Foresbrook Road through Panther Parkway and a new road that is by-right a...

CONWAY, S.C. (WPDE) — In a week where the county was handed litigation over development approvals, several projects made it through both County Council and Planning Commission meetings.

Thursday a major development passed through the Horry County Planning Commission that could bring hundreds of homes to Forestbrook. Board members agreed to let the County Council review the nearly 900 unit development of land between Highway 31, Highway 544 and connecting to Foresbrook Road through Panther Parkway and a new road that is by-right allowed for the zoning.

The development approval comes after roughly 508 acres of land, some zoned for Commercial Forest Agriculture and others a different residential criteria, were on the agenda to all rezone for multi-residential construction.

Neighbors at the meeting had key concerns surrounding traffic, flooding, as well as infrastructure to support the development. They were concerned over the ability for first responders to have accessibility, proper fire control water lines as well as updates to an already crowded neighborhood school.

"This affects our children, this affects our future," said Sarah Conrad who lives in Hunter's Ridge Crossing and on a fixed income as a disabled veteran. "How does any of this makes sense?"

Board members, by the end of the night, approved for roughly 380 acres of land to be newly rezoned for home development. The final decision now falls on the County Council.

The key project approved was a 900 unit development, which would butt to neighborhoods like Hunter's Ridge Crossing as well as Amberfield. It rezones more than 265 acres to become residential. County staff worked with the engineers for the project, DDC Engineering, to have two roads from the development connect to Forestbrook. One would be close to 544 and according to firm executive Mike Wooten, the traffic light would be built by SCDOT after a warrant analysis. The second light could possibly come in at Forestbrook and Panther Parkway after the development is connected to Ocean Bay Drive.

"By the time we get to any appreciable traffic on this project, Forestbrook Road will have well been completed," said Wooten before board members.

Ocean Bay Drive, however, is a private road. County staff say the developer needs to come to an agreement with the HOA to improve the road to county standards and then the county will take it over. This then would connect to Panthers Parkway. Right now the project estimates, at full capacity, roughly 10,000 vehicles would come in and out of the by-right entry road that will be built. County staff hopes connecting to Ocean Bay Drive would be a safer addition.

"We can't handle it," said Tiffany Krawcyk who lives in Hunter's Ridge Crossing as well. "Everyone who signed the petition were in agreement that there is just not enough infrastructure to support all of the development."

Krawcyk circulated a petition in her neighborhood, however, she said most neighbors thought it was pointless.

“They just really need to know how the residents are feeling. They are feeling hopeless and sad," Krawcyk said. "When I went and did the petitions, no one else was doing anything about it because they said it’s hopeless.”

Development for the Forestboork Road Ride 3 Project is not expected to begin until 2024. Wooten said the project meets all county stormwater and drainage requirements as well. He said it also meets the comprehensive plan. County staff said county council plans to host a public meeting before the development proposal goes in front of them.

Market Common vs. Carolina Forest: ‘Not in my backyard,’ residents say to block development

Weeks after Myrtle Beach leaders derailed plans for a 200-home development inside Market Common, Horry County officials were given details on a large project that would alter the scope of Carolina Forest.A common refrain of ‘not in my backyard’ seems to be popping up in discussions from residents in both communities in attempt to block future developments.Market Common residents have said they don’t want to be the next Carolina Forest, mean lots of homes. Carolina Forest residents do not want to be the next Ma...

Weeks after Myrtle Beach leaders derailed plans for a 200-home development inside Market Common, Horry County officials were given details on a large project that would alter the scope of Carolina Forest.

A common refrain of ‘not in my backyard’ seems to be popping up in discussions from residents in both communities in attempt to block future developments.

Market Common residents have said they don’t want to be the next Carolina Forest, mean lots of homes. Carolina Forest residents do not want to be the next Market Common with mixed development including businesses near homes.

“We don’t want to see another Carolina Forest,” Paul Meunier, president of The Reserve at Market Common, said. “If it gets to have so many houses down here, it’s no longer like the area we bought in.”

As opponents lined up against both, common themes emerged with concerns about overcrowding, traffic, public safety and flooding dominating the conversation.

“You keep on adding people and adding people, and it’s going to affect quality of life down the road. You can’t look at it in a myopic way,” Carolina Forest resident Sherry Reed said.

Here’s a look at what might happen in both areas in the coming months.

Although the popular shopping district expects to hit full retail capacity by the end of 2023, the inability to add 200 more rental units means lost revenue and a likely delay in building renovation work, property manager Heather Gray said earlier this month.

In late March, the city council’s vote to halt MarketWalk — a planned residential plaza at the intersection of Farrow Parkway and Phillis Boulevard — cut nearly $472,000 a year in anticipated rental income.

MarketWalk’s defeat came on the heels of major pushback from a nearby homeowners’ association and other Market Common residents who said the prospect of marathon stop lights and even more congestion at a gateway to the community should matter more than putting more rooftops into the district.

Market Common owner HomeFed could return to the idea of a hotel on the property — the original plan for the area.

At issue is whether to convert 175 total acres for commercial and retail use — anchored by 1,154 homes.

Although the residential and commercial components must be decided separately, they’re designed to complement one another.

Planning documents for a proposal called Chatham Crossing show a request to flip 34 acres along Postal Way — which feeds onto U.S. Highway 501 — from light industrial into a more versatile retail zoning to include multi-family residential, townhomes, gas stations, self-storage, restaurants/bars, retail, grocery stores and gyms. Medical offices and repair services also would be permitted.

Norm Fay, president of the Covington Lake HOA inside Carolina Forest, said pulling land out of commercial zoning to make room for housing would affect future growth within the area by limiting retail options for existing residents.

“Down the road, this area is going to need commercial property along 501. To take away that commercial property, I think, is absolutely wrong,” he said.

County officials said if the rezoning is approved, no homes would be put into Chatham Crossing. Construction would start in June 2026, with full build-out by the spring of 2028.

A neighboring 129-acre parcel abutting Chatham Crossing would go from undeveloped commercial land into a planned mixed-use development called The Waters. That brings the possibility of mobile food trucks and a farmers market along with the 1,154 homes.

As part of the deal, project managers would make $1.7 million worth of infrastructure and road upgrades to support the additional population, including adding a third lane to Postal Way and building two roundabouts within the subdivision.

When fully built out, the Waters planned development district could add an estimated 10,000 more daily trips along the roadways, according to a traffic analysis. It currently sees 17,500 trips.

Clemson researchers’ mail survey asks Carolina Forest residents about interactions with black bears

CAROLINA FOREST, S.C. (WBTW) — Carolina Forest residents are urged to check their mailboxes because they might be one of 3,000 people randomly selected to feedback about interactions with black bears in the area.Carolina Forest is no stranger to black bears, which is why one Clemson University professor wants residents to fill out a survey about how they feel when they see a bear.Clemson graduate student Victoria Reibel and Dr. Shari Rodriguez, an associate professor, are working together on the study. The survey asks res...

CAROLINA FOREST, S.C. (WBTW) — Carolina Forest residents are urged to check their mailboxes because they might be one of 3,000 people randomly selected to feedback about interactions with black bears in the area.

Carolina Forest is no stranger to black bears, which is why one Clemson University professor wants residents to fill out a survey about how they feel when they see a bear.

Clemson graduate student Victoria Reibel and Dr. Shari Rodriguez, an associate professor, are working together on the study. The survey asks residents how they would feel if they saw a bear in their neighborhood or how likely they might be to ask for help from wildlife officials.

“There’s going to be less and less habitat for these animals,” Rodriguez said. “They’re either going to adapt and become more urban-suburban animals or they’re going to die out.”

The researchers said they chose Carolina Forest because it is a fast-growing area and bears are being pushed out. Rodriguez said they want to help the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources maintain a healthy population of bears.

“[We are] spending the time to understand how people fit into this equation because a bear is going to be a bear,” ” Rodriguez said. “A bear’s going to look for food, cover. It’s going to look for water. It’s going to look for [a] safe habitat where it can reproduce.”

Reibel and Rodriguez said they’ve been working together with DNR and Appalachian Bear Rescue for about a year and a half. They said most black bears reside in the Upstate, but some live along the coast in Carolina Forest.

“It’s not something that tourists or folks who may be new to the area necessarily know or would expect because it’s kind of weird to think about Myrtle Beach and then think about black bears,” Reibel said.

The survey was sent out to residents at the beginning of November, and they’ve already received 200 responses. They hope to get a 30% response rate in the end.

Rodriguez said it’s crucial in any kind of conversation study that people cooperate.

“We can’t gain, you know, any viable conclusions without them participating,” she said. “They are the most important part of this study.”

* * *

Adrianna Lawrence is a multimedia journalist at News13. Adrianna is originally from Virginia Beach, Virginia, and joined the News13 team in June 2023 after graduating from Virginia Commonwealth University in May 2023. Keep up with Adrianna on Instagram, Facebook, and X, formerly Twitter. You can also read more of her work, here.

Carolina Forest residents get heated at meeting to discuss Postal Way development

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WPDE) — Some people living in the Carolina Forest area continue to push back against a rezoning request along Postal Way.The project would bring more than 1,000 homes and business space to the area.A community discussion was held Wednesday night at the Carolina Forest Recreation Center, and some who attended expressed heavy opposition.Residents said they have an issue with the lack of communication between the Horry County Board of Education, council members and residents.They said they w...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WPDE) — Some people living in the Carolina Forest area continue to push back against a rezoning request along Postal Way.

The project would bring more than 1,000 homes and business space to the area.

A community discussion was held Wednesday night at the Carolina Forest Recreation Center, and some who attended expressed heavy opposition.

Residents said they have an issue with the lack of communication between the Horry County Board of Education, council members and residents.

They said they wish everyone would meet about any rezoning proposal to address potential problems before anything is announced.

However, three main concerns were brought up during the meeting: traffic, overcrowding of schools, and safety of residents.

SUGGESTED: Postal Way widening and more proposed in request for 1100+ homes in Carolina Forest

For those who live in a development off Gardner Lacy Road, they're concerned if the development goes through, and an emergency happens, that they'll be stuck in their homes with no way to get out.

“If anything happens to Gardner Lacy, we’re not getting out because Postal Way is not going to cover us. We can’t get out left, we can’t get out right... These are issues that need to be addressed before any housing goes in," one Carolina Forest resident said.

For another concerned resident, she said there won't be enough first responders to handle the influx of people.

“What happens to our stations when they can’t handle the calls anymore because there’s all of these new communities? Why doesn’t the safety of the residents that live here come first?"

Rich Astle lives in Waterford, a nearby neighborhood, and said it's like a zoo as people cut through their development to avoid 501 traffic.

“Our issue in Waterford is definitely unique because we have two entrances. So, what happens is we have an entrance on Gardner Lacy, we have an entrance on Carolina Forest Boulevard. So, what happens is the high school gets out, they want to travel East, they come through Waterford- they do not want to go down Postal Way because it’s a traffic mess. Then, you get all the people coming down Gardner Lacy or from Clear Pond through our development to go to Carolina Forest Elementary because it goes right up to their parking lot. In the morning, noon time, from 3-4, it’s just a zoo with traffic," he said.

Astle said he thinks the development is a good idea, but now isn't the time- and other residents agree with him.

SUGGESTED: Hwy 501 Widening Project not enough to relieve current capacity, SCDOT says

"They have to figure out how to solve those issues. And I do think that the Board of Education and council have to get together more often. I don’t know if they meet that often, but they should before they come out with a development, say ‘hey these are the needs of the community’ and be able to talk about all these issues before they even bring it to the table," he said.

Many residents at the meeting expressed how current infrastructure issues need to be addressed before any new development comes to the Carolina Forest area.

Some residents said they're in favor of the project because the developers offered to pay for a frontage road, meaning taxpayers wouldn't have to.

Horry County Councilman Dennis DiSabato reiterated that if this development doesn't get approved, something else would just replace it.

“This is in your best interest. I’m not benefiting from this at all, all this gives me is heartburn," he said.

A second reading on the proposed rezoning is set to be voted on at Tuesday's council meeting.

ABC15 will keep you updated on what happens.

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