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Lowco Roofing is a family-owned and operated business with over 30 years of roofing experience. There's no roofing project too small or large for our team to handle. We've seen and done it all, from major roof replacements to preventative roofing maintenance. When combined with our customer service, material selection, and available warranties, our experience sets us apart from other roofing contractors.

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From shingles, metal, and tile to commercial flat roofing, Lowco Roofing has the product lines and expertise to complete your job correctly, on time, and within your budget. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, we offer the largest selection of shingle styles and products from the most trusted name in shingle manufacturers.

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The benefits of Lowco roof installations include:

It might seem obvious, but replacing an old roof is a safe, responsible decision for your family. This is especially true if you know for sure that your current roof is in bad shape.

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Be the envy of your neighborhood! Replacing your old which makes your home look great and can increase the value of your property when it's time to sell.

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Because Lowco Roofing uses top-quality roofing materials and shingles from Owens Corning, you can be confident your roof will last for years.

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There are many reasons why you might want to consider replacing your roof, but most often, the choice stems from necessity. But how do you know when it's time to replace instead of repair?

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From roof repairs to roof replacement, there's no better company to trust than Lowco Roofing. We have the expertise, experience, products, and tools to get the job done right, no matter your roofing problem. We'll work with you to select the best materials for your roofing needs and budget, and we'll make sure the job is done right from start to finish.

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Latest News in Bucksport, SC

Bucksport residents share flood concerns with US Army Corps of Engineers

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WPDE) — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District and Horry County leaders are working to mitigate future flooding in the area.They held a community input meeting in Bucksport Wednesday to give residents a chance to share their concerns on flooding and give input on ways to help.The small town of Bucksport sits between the Waccamaw and Great Pee Dee rivers.SUGGESTED: ...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WPDE) — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District and Horry County leaders are working to mitigate future flooding in the area.

They held a community input meeting in Bucksport Wednesday to give residents a chance to share their concerns on flooding and give input on ways to help.

The small town of Bucksport sits between the Waccamaw and Great Pee Dee rivers.

SUGGESTED: Bucksport receives grant to help with flooding issues

U.S Army Corps of Engineers project manager Bethney Ward said this is the first flood management risk study ever conducted that covers such a large area in Horry County.

She said Wednesday's meeting was the first step in the four-year-long plan to help better understand flooding and flood risks from the Waccamaw River and its tributaries.

Vida was born and raised in Bucksport and said she's seen the disastrous effects flooding has had on the area and the residents.

"Flooded out all the people on the lower part of Bucksport Road. But we never got flooded when I was a child," Vida said.

But she said the community is resilient, and those who remain aren't going to let the water run them out.

“I’m getting ready to move back here and I’d love to get involved and help to keep that place clean so people can remain in their homes," she said.

Vida said she's concerned about the tributaries being blocked, making the water stagnant and dirty.

“At least let the water flow through for the other animals that reside in the area. And as you know, there are a lot of trees in that swamp area that do need the freshwater- that’s my main concern."

Ward said they've identified three major flood impact areas in Horry County including Longs, Conway, and Bucksport.

SUGGESTED: Resident input wanted for Waccamaw River Flood Risk Management Study

She said those flood impact areas were chosen based on past flooding.

“Getting input from the community is really important. It’s part of the Army Corps of Engineers process, we always get input from stakeholders. We want to develop solutions that will fit the community and meet their needs," Ward said.

But for Vida, she just hopes: “The study is working to take care of some of the problems and the flooding in Bucksport. In the meantime, if you’re going to take care of the flooding, open the tributary up so the animals have water to drink," she said.

We spoke with another Bucksport resident who said he had to move out of his original house and into another one because of flooding caused by Hurricane Florence in 2018.

He said there was about four feet of water in his house, and he hopes something will finally be done to help the people of his town.

The Army Corps of Engineers expects to release a draft report next summer where they'll get public input again before anything is finalized.

$450M highway project receives support from Horry County Council

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WPDE) — On Tuesday night, Horry County Council approved what some residents believe is a controversial decision.They approved a resolution that could bring in a new four-lane highway through areas like Bucksport and Burgess.READ MORE: Residents concerned for ecological, cultural harm from potential new Horry Co. highwaySELL, or the Southern E...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WPDE) — On Tuesday night, Horry County Council approved what some residents believe is a controversial decision.

They approved a resolution that could bring in a new four-lane highway through areas like Bucksport and Burgess.

READ MORE: Residents concerned for ecological, cultural harm from potential new Horry Co. highway

SELL, or the Southern Evacuation Lifeline is a $450 million highway project potentially coming to Horry County.

The highway could connect Highway 22 to Highway 701 South, and then end at either Highway 707 or Highway 17 Bypass in Murrells Inlet. But councilmembers ultimately eluded to the fact that right now, it's unclear where the exact connecting points would be.

However, the project still left multiple Burgess and Bucksport residents with several concerns.

"This is one of the most sensitive environmental; it's gonna have an environmental impact on us like you wouldn't believe," said Cad Holmes.

Another Burgess resident added, "The sell route running through this wildlife refuge would further impact its ability to store flood waters, let alone the impacts that would happen in Bucksport, which is already drowning in flood waters with five major floods since 2016."

TOP STORY: Inmates save officer after being attacked with knife at SC prison

"Another reason we don't need sell in burgess-- the traffic," said resident Becky Ryan.

After hearing from residents, and before giving their approval on the funding support, the council made an amendment to the resolution.

Horry County Councilman Mark Causey it explained the amendment as, "Just so we can put some language in there to try to protect the communities, try to protect the historical value of what they have there. We don't want to do anything at all to harm these communities; they have a long history in Horry County, and that's our plan moving forward, is to give them some protection."

"We're still in the environmental impact statement," said Councilman Tyler Servant. "There has not been a selection of where the road is going; is that correct? So, we're still really in the preliminary process of this, and so, there's going to be community meetings as we move forward into the summertime."

Because things like additional environmental studies still need to be completed, administrators with the county are expecting it will be at least eight years before any construction could be done on the project.

'I think the river is going to reclaim Bucksport:' Neighbors hurt while Waccamaw crests

BUCKSPORT, S.C. (WPDE) — The Waccamaw River started to crest Friday, and neighbors living in the Bucksport community are dealing with their homes, and roads they drive every day are underwater.Most said it’s something they’ve been trying to learn how to deal with over the last few years.“We’re encountering flood, after flood, after flood,” said Jennifer Hunt, who has lived in Bucksport her whole life. “We never had this when I was growing up!”RELATED: ...

BUCKSPORT, S.C. (WPDE) — The Waccamaw River started to crest Friday, and neighbors living in the Bucksport community are dealing with their homes, and roads they drive every day are underwater.

Most said it’s something they’ve been trying to learn how to deal with over the last few years.

“We’re encountering flood, after flood, after flood,” said Jennifer Hunt, who has lived in Bucksport her whole life. “We never had this when I was growing up!”

RELATED: Flooding closes several roads in Pee Dee, Grand Strand

“I was born here in 1959,” said Gary Gause, “and up until about eight years ago, it never flooded. Something is taking effect.”

Bucksport Road was completely submerged Friday, and so was Big Bull Road.

“It got about eight to twelve inches of water over Bucksport Road,” Gause said. “Four or five of them got at least a foot of water in their garage.”

It’s a new way of life that has neighbors like Hunt praying for one another.

READ MORE: Horry Co. neighbors demand accountability from leaders to fix flooding issues

“Miss Marie had to get a whole new house, Renne had to get a whole new house, Theresa had to have her house repaired,” she said. “I had to go five or six miles out of my way just to get home!”

The more it happens, the more neighbors said it pushes people away from everything they have ever known.

“You feel like you’re being run off your property or run out of your community,” said Hunt.

“A lot of people are moving out. We were already a poor community,” said Gause. “I think the river is going to reclaim Bucksport Road like it was maybe 2,000 years ago.”

For now, neighbors said they hope someone can come to them soon with a solution, and they hope Bucksport won’t be forgotten. They’re focusing on Bucksport roots in the meantime.

“We all love one another, and if anything happens to one, it happens to all,” said Hunt.

“We love one another,” Gause said, “but every time this comes, it sets us back a little more.”

Coastal Carolina University students step in to help Bucksport area with flooding, cultural preservation

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - After several years of dealing with flooding, residents in the Bucksport area are getting more answers from the world of academia.Several students at Coastal Carolina University are getting hands-on experience with the community’s flooding issues and how it’s impacting residents’ daily life through a sustainability assessment.It’s also giving them a better look at the historical significance of Bucksport.“The absolute treasure this community is to not just Horry C...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - After several years of dealing with flooding, residents in the Bucksport area are getting more answers from the world of academia.

Several students at Coastal Carolina University are getting hands-on experience with the community’s flooding issues and how it’s impacting residents’ daily life through a sustainability assessment.

It’s also giving them a better look at the historical significance of Bucksport.

“The absolute treasure this community is to not just Horry County or neighboring county but to the history of United States,” said Pamela Martin, professor of politics and international relations at CCU. “They are family of descendent of slaves from plantations. They hold cultural knowledge from the Gullah culture and they hold a local knowledge of their environment that we are losing.”

Each year the Bucksport community is losing more and more due to flooding, whether it comes from flash floods, hurricanes or even just strong thunderstorms rolling through. It’s made some residents feel neglected for how long Bucksport has to wait to get aid.

While Bucksport holds historical value from the Gullah culture, the community has struggled to be further represented in Horry County.

“Bucksport is this indigenous community that has been there forever but they don’t see them as something they can make money from, ” said CCU student Katey Zimmerman, who’s part of the research group.

Fellow student Jairan Parker says they’re doing what they can to help the people and preserve what they have left.

“We started studying the wetlands and how natural disasters affect the area,” he said. “Also how flooding interacts with their community as well as the three rivers that surround the community.”

The students also head into Bucksport itself, assisting in community meetings and speaking with residents in order to gain a better understanding of the issues.

However, as their semester passed by, it has become harder to find certain data for the students.

“We’ve been able to have enough data is important to what we are looking into is the most important thing and is the most alarming thing because there is a lack of data on Bucksport altogether,” said Parker.

The research deals with how Bucksport’s economy, environment and community are being impacted by flooding. One thing Zimmerman is concerned about is that flooding within the community is on the verge of losing its culture.

“It has the potential to destroy parts of their culture like they have a lot of cultural places around the community like the slave cemetery and it has been unmarked so they can’t protect it against things like development and flooding,” said Zimmerman “We’ve suggested that they should mark the places that could be eco-tourism so it can be protected against flooding and everything.”

The students will create a full report next month, which community leaders can take to the county to apply for funding to restore damages from flooding. On the whole, the group said they’re using all their resources to help.

“They are misrepresented and I feel like they are left out of certain things that I feel they should be included. Comes in when being able to receive infrastructure and improving the flood systems,” said Parker.

Furman University and Duke University are also contributing their own research towards Bucksport flooding.

For example, Duke is doing a hydrologic assessment and that’s the understanding of how the water flows within the area - which could go towards taking steps to ensure less flooding in the future.

Copyright 2021 WMBF. All rights reserved.

'We found you’: Horry County residents discover long lost cemetery with possible slave graves

Residents of the Bucksport Community in Horry County find the Eddy Lake Cemetery that possibly contain the graves of past ancestors.HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - A lost family that is now home.That’s the feeling for residents who feel connected to a recently discovered cemetery that was found in the Bucksport community of Horry County.“We found you, we found you. You heard about it, it’s almost like Big Foot; does it really it exist?" said Bucksport resident Kevin Mishoe, explaining the moment he w...

Residents of the Bucksport Community in Horry County find the Eddy Lake Cemetery that possibly contain the graves of past ancestors.

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - A lost family that is now home.

That’s the feeling for residents who feel connected to a recently discovered cemetery that was found in the Bucksport community of Horry County.

“We found you, we found you. You heard about it, it’s almost like Big Foot; does it really it exist?" said Bucksport resident Kevin Mishoe, explaining the moment he was there to witness the cemetery discovery.

It’s located on property owned by Grand Strand Water and Sewer, and recent road construction in Bucksport stirred up the urged to find the cemetery.

Mary Ann Owens, a longtime Bucksport resident and self-proclaimed historian for the community, said as a child she heard stories about the Eddy Lake Cemetery but no one could ever tell her where it was located.

“As a young girl growing up in this area, I often listened to what elder people were talking about. As matter of fact, I would go to their porch and sit on the edge of their porch just so I could hear what they were talking about," said Owens. “Often they would talk about Eddy Lake, Eddy Lake and how their parents worked at the sawmill at Eddy Lake.”

Owens said it was stories of her great-great-grandfather, Reverend John Mishoe, that prompted her curiosity.

“(Someone said) ‘Your great-great-grandfather is buried at Eddy Lake,’ and I decided at that point I was going to find my great-great-grandfather,” said Owens. “He was a noted man in this area. He was a preacher, a traveling preacher, and I just heard all good things.”

Determined to leave no stone unturned to find her lost relative, Owens followed the trail left behind by her ancestors that led her straight to the Eddy Lake Cemetery.

“I took the 1860 Census that did not give out a name, only a number, the owner and the number of slaves they had," Owens said.

Even in their forever sleep they were speaking.

“I was connected to this area immediately. As soon as I took a step out here I knew oh this is it,” Owens said.

Kevin Mishoe, who also heard the stories of Eddy Lake Cemetery, explained the area now known as Bucksport was formally known as Bucks Township and it was part of the mill that built the Henrietta, the largest wooden ship ever constructed in South Carolina.

That ship was launched from Bucksville in April 1875. Eddy Lake was part of that area and was reportedly where many of people who worked at the mill lived.

Mishoe said while searching the website findagrave.com, it told him the Eddy Lake Cemetery was destroyed. What happened to it was not immediately known.

“We finally got a good geographical of where it should be and sure enough it was just as simple as walking through the woods and they’ve been here waiting on us all this time,” said Mishoe, who is also heading the restoration project for the cemetery. “We’re launching this effort to clean it up because not only is this a good find for this area of Bucksport, but for the African American culture as a whole.”

The cemetery could possibly contain close to 100 graves marked and unmarked, and is a significant discovery for the community.

Mishoe said preliminary findings show the cemetery could be about a football field in-depth, about three-fourths of it in width, which is about 67,000 square feet.

Workers with Horry County Planning and Zoning have been instrumental in helping identify some of the sites, marking them with flags. There are also dozens of depressions in the ground, which indicate a grave without a headstone. Owens said underneath all the ground debris and brush there could be other grave markings. That could include pots and pans, conch shells, “whatever they thought would remind them of their loved ones being buried in this site.”

Mishoe said workers gave strict instruction not to touch anything - especially the headstones - as the oils in human fingers could destroy them. He is calling on the community to help bring this cemetery back to life and is currently seeking help from professionals and volunteers to clean the property and restore the headstones.

“When God drops us these nuggets, we have to use it. You know we learn so many different ways but when we can get a visual and a hands-on, the learning is much more solid for us," Mishoe said.

He wants today’s youth and future generations to know the stories of their ancestors.

“Here’s where we began, here’s where our people made their contribution," Mishoe said.

In order to receive help from historic preservation organizations and archaeologists, Mishoe said the community first needs to clear and remove the initial brush and debris at the site. There is now a GoFundMe page set up to raise funds for the project.

Meanwhile, the Horry County Board of Architectural Review will hold a hearing at its next meeting to decide whether to add the Eddy Lake Cemetery to the Horry County Historical Property list. The meeting is March 17.

Copyright 2020 WMBF. All rights reserved.

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