Skip to main content

Roofing company in Briarcliffe Acres, SC

Request a Free Estimate

 Roof Replacement Briarcliffe Acres, SC

What Clients Say About Us

When you choose Lowco Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the very best:

Experience

Lowco Roofing is a family-owned and operated business with over 30 years of roofing experience. There's no roofing project too small or large for our team to handle. We've seen and done it all, from major roof replacements to preventative roofing maintenance. When combined with our customer service, material selection, and available warranties, our experience sets us apart from other roofing contractors.

Reputation

Lowco Roofing has earned the respect and admiration of our customers by delivering the best craftsmanship and overall customer satisfaction. Our team is happy to assist you with any questions you have. Whether you need a roof inspection for your new home or have questions about roofing shingles, we're here to serve you.

Selection

From shingles, metal, and tile to commercial flat roofing, Lowco Roofing has the product lines and expertise to complete your job correctly, on time, and within your budget. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, we offer the largest selection of shingle styles and products from the most trusted name in shingle manufacturers.

Warranty Coverage

As roofing experts, we know that warranties are important to our customers. That's why we offer the best product warranties around, including lifetime warranties on our shingles. With these warranties in place, you can have peace of mind knowing that your roof protects what matters most in your life.

End Heading

The benefits of Lowco roof installations include:

It might seem obvious, but replacing an old roof is a safe, responsible decision for your family. This is especially true if you know for sure that your current roof is in bad shape.

Safety

Be the envy of your neighborhood! Replacing your old which makes your home look great and can increase the value of your property when it's time to sell.

Enhanced Curb Appeal

Installing a new roof is often a more energy-efficient option than keeping your old one. As a bonus, many homeowners enjoy lower utility and energy bills when replacing their roofs.

Energy Efficient

Because Lowco Roofing uses top-quality roofing materials and shingles from Owens Corning, you can be confident your roof will last for years.

Long-Lasting

There are many reasons why you might want to consider replacing your roof, but most often, the choice stems from necessity. But how do you know when it's time to replace instead of repair?

End Heading

Let Us Show You the Lowco Difference

There's a reason why so many South Carolina homeowners turn to Lowco for roofing services. Sure, we could talk about our accolades and how we're better than other roofing companies. But the truth is, we'd prefer to show you with hard work and fair pricing.

From roof repairs to roof replacement, there's no better company to trust than Lowco Roofing. We have the expertise, experience, products, and tools to get the job done right, no matter your roofing problem. We'll work with you to select the best materials for your roofing needs and budget, and we'll make sure the job is done right from start to finish.

24-7

CALL US NOW

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-937-2040

Free Consultation

Latest News in Briarcliffe Acres, SC

Myrtle Beach swim advisories: Here are the 13 South Carolina beach advisories for 2019

The 13 beaches in South Carolina that remain under long-term water quality advisories are located along the Grand Strand, the state’s most popular beach tourism destination that welcomes 18-20 million visitors each year.Water quality along the Grand Strand area of Myrtle Beach has worsened in recent years, according to ...

The 13 beaches in South Carolina that remain under long-term water quality advisories are located along the Grand Strand, the state’s most popular beach tourism destination that welcomes 18-20 million visitors each year.

Water quality along the Grand Strand area of Myrtle Beach has worsened in recent years, according to an analysis by The Greenville News and Anderson Independent-Mail of nine years of monitoring data self-reported by the state to the Environmental Protection Agency.

TELLING IMPORTANT STORIES

Through local journalism we help keep you informed about sometimes difficult issues in the community. Become a subscriber and access all our stories. Here's our special offer.

The percentage of tests that have failed to meet the state’s standard measure for the amount of bacteria in the water has increased from an average of 2% in 2010 and 2014 to a high of 11% in 2018, even as the state conducted fewer tests, according to data the state Department of Health and Environmental Control provided to the EPA as part of its participation in a federal beach water quality program.

SC beach advisories for 2019

► 13th Avenue S. Surfside Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 10%-15% of time

► Swash at 5th Avenue N., Surfside Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 20%-25% of time

► Ocean Lakes Campground south end, Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 10%-15% of time

► Ocean Lakes Campground north end, Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 10%-15% of time

► Beaverdam Creek Swash, Creekside Drive, Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 20%-25% of time

► Springmaid Beach Midway Swash, Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 20%-25% of time

► Family Kingdom Amusement Park, Withers Swash, Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 25%-30% of time

► 8th Avenue N., Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 10%-15% of time

► 24th Avenue N., Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 15%-20% of time

► 68th Avenue N, Cane Patch Swash, Myrtle Beach — bacteria exceeds standard 15%-20% of time

► Bear Branch Swash near Grand Dunes Ocean Club, Arcadia — bacteria exceeds standard 20%-25% of time

► Singleton Swash near The Dunes Golf & Beach Club, Arcadia — bacteria exceeds standard less than 10% of time.

► White Point Swash, Briarcliffe Acres — bacteria exceeds standard 15%-20% of time

Which South Carolina cities have the most expensive homes?

(Stacker) — Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of June 2022.The charts in this story were created autom...

(Stacker) — Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of June 2022.

The charts in this story were created automatically using Matplotlib. The most expensive city on the list has a typical home value of $3,402,190 which is 1,067% higher than the state average of $291,591.

Metros with the most cities in the top 30 in South Carolina#1. Charleston-North Charleston: 13#2. Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort: 5#3. Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia: 3#3. Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach: 3#5. Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin: 2#6. Columbia: 1#6. Georgetown: 1#6. Seneca: 1

Read on to see which cities made the list.

You may also like: Highest-earning counties in South Carolina

#30. Townville

– Typical home value: $398,576– 1-year price change: +29.4%– 5-year price change: +71.2%– Metro area: Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin

#29. North Myrtle Beach

– Typical home value: $399,767– 1-year price change: +39.6%– 5-year price change: +78.7%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach

#28. Clover

– Typical home value: $411,130– 1-year price change: +31.6%– 5-year price change: +73.2%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia

#27. Chapin

– Typical home value: $428,079– 1-year price change: +27.2%– 5-year price change: +54.0%– Metro area: Columbia

#26. Saint Helena Island

– Typical home value: $440,933– 1-year price change: +43.8%– 5-year price change: +69.0%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

You may also like: Best colleges in South Carolina

#25. Pinopolis

– Typical home value: $453,978– 1-year price change: +20.4%– 5-year price change: +68.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#24. Bluffton

– Typical home value: $463,177– 1-year price change: +37.4%– 5-year price change: +68.7%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#23. Hollywood

– Typical home value: $464,342– 1-year price change: +27.5%– 5-year price change: +66.5%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#22. Surfside Beach

– Typical home value: $472,480– 1-year price change: +38.0%– 5-year price change: +80.7%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach

#21. Pawleys Island

– Typical home value: $480,203– 1-year price change: +29.3%– 5-year price change: +57.0%– Metro area: Georgetown

You may also like: Highest rated beer in South Carolina

#20. Salem

– Typical home value: $496,349– 1-year price change: +33.7%– 5-year price change: +79.7%– Metro area: Seneca

#19. Ravenel

– Typical home value: $502,597– 1-year price change: +27.9%– 5-year price change: +80.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#18. Fort Mill

– Typical home value: $505,368– 1-year price change: +31.9%– 5-year price change: +68.9%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia

#17. Charleston

– Typical home value: $520,311– 1-year price change: +30.3%– 5-year price change: +64.2%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#16. Tega Cay

– Typical home value: $553,959– 1-year price change: +30.6%– 5-year price change: +83.2%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia

You may also like: Highest-earning cities in South Carolina

#15. Edisto Beach

– Typical home value: $581,239– 1-year price change: +20.6%– 5-year price change: +47.6%– Metro area: not in a metro area

#14. Wadmalaw Island

– Typical home value: $626,506– 1-year price change: +27.9%– 5-year price change: +64.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#13. Awendaw

– Typical home value: $632,803– 1-year price change: +23.6%– 5-year price change: +52.9%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#12. Okatie

– Typical home value: $638,747– 1-year price change: +36.7%– 5-year price change: +63.1%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#11. Meggett

– Typical home value: $715,588– 1-year price change: +28.1%– 5-year price change: +57.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

You may also like: South Carolina is the #8 state with the most people living near toxic release facilities

#10. Mount Pleasant

– Typical home value: $747,165– 1-year price change: +32.8%– 5-year price change: +61.2%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#9. Hilton Head Island

– Typical home value: $748,547– 1-year price change: +40.9%– 5-year price change: +80.2%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#8. Seabrook Island

– Typical home value: $862,369– 1-year price change: +39.5%– 5-year price change: +72.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#7. Briarcliffe Acres

– Typical home value: $889,330– 1-year price change: +40.7%– 5-year price change: +89.9%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach

#6. Sunset

– Typical home value: $1,198,759– 1-year price change: +35.2%– 5-year price change: +65.5%– Metro area: Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin

You may also like: Most popular girl names in the 70s in South Carolina

#5. Folly Beach

– Typical home value: $1,378,103– 1-year price change: +45.0%– 5-year price change: +89.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#4. Isle of Palms

– Typical home value: $1,612,539– 1-year price change: +47.8%– 5-year price change: +88.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#3. Kiawah Island

– Typical home value: $1,794,143– 1-year price change: +41.2%– 5-year price change: +63.0%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#2. Sheldon

– Typical home value: $2,488,888– 1-year price change: +36.8%– 5-year price change: +54.1%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#1. Sullivans Island

– Typical home value: $3,402,190– 1-year price change: +35.8%– 5-year price change: +91.5%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

You may also like: Best high schools in South Carolina

When filing opens for area municipal elections

Want to serve your town or city, and help make the decisions that will guide the future? Now may be your chance.The candidate filing period for Aynor, Atlantic Beach and Briarcliffe Acres opened on Thursday, Aug. 10, and closes Thursday, Aug. 24, according to scvotes.gov.Candidates for city offices in Loris and Myrtle Beach can file from Aug. 24 to Sept. 8, while the window to file for candidates from Conway, North Myrtle Beach and Surfside Beach is Aug. 25 throu...

Want to serve your town or city, and help make the decisions that will guide the future? Now may be your chance.

The candidate filing period for Aynor, Atlantic Beach and Briarcliffe Acres opened on Thursday, Aug. 10, and closes Thursday, Aug. 24, according to scvotes.gov.

Candidates for city offices in Loris and Myrtle Beach can file from Aug. 24 to Sept. 8, while the window to file for candidates from Conway, North Myrtle Beach and Surfside Beach is Aug. 25 through Sept. 8, according to the website.

Several mayoral positions, and council seats, will be up for grabs in each of the county’s cities and towns, according to scvotes.gov. Council members serve four-year, staggered terms.

In Myrtle Beach, a trio of council seats — those held by Mike Chestnut, John Krajc and Philip Render — are up for re-election, said Mark Kruea, the city’s chief public information officer.

That is the same for North Myrtle Beach, where an at-large seat held by Hank Thomas and seats occupied by J.O. Baldwin of Crescent Beach and Fred Coyne of Cherry Grove will be on the ballot, said Ryan Fabbri, assistant to the city manager

In Loris, Mayor Todd Harrelson and council members Jan Vescovi, Joan Gause and Lewis Hardee face reelection this year, city officials said.

In Surfside Beach, Town Clerk Sheri Medina said three seats on the city council are up for re-election this year. Those seats are held by Cindy Keating, Michael Drake and Paul Holder. Mayor Bob Hellyer also faces reelection.

In Conway, Mayor Barbara Jo Blain-Bellamy’s seat will be on the ballot, along with council seats currently filled by Autry Benton, Justin Jordan and Larry White.

Municipal officials in Atlantic Beach, Aynor and Briarcliffe Acres didn’t respond to a request for information about open seats.

The 2023 election is slated for Tuesday, Nov. 7, with runoffs for cities set for Nov. 21, if necessary. County, state and federal elections will be held next year.

Residents of South Carolina have until 30 days before an election to register to vote.

Residents can register to vote online at scvotes.gov. You may also register at any county library and the county election office. Registration is also available at state Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Social Services and Mental Health offices.

Cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina

Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of February 2023. The charts in this story were created automatically using Matplotlib. The most expensive city on the...

Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of February 2023. The charts in this story were created automatically using Matplotlib. The most expensive city on the list has a typical home value of $1,277,274, which is 1,151% higher than the state average of $267,835.

Metros with the most cities in the top 30 in South Carolina #1. Charleston-North Charleston, SC: 15 #2. Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC: 5 #3. Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC: 3 #4. Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC: 2 #4. Georgetown, SC: 2 #6. Columbia, SC: 1 #6. Greenville-Anderson, SC: 1 #6. Seneca, SC: 1

Read on to see which cities made the list.

You may also like: Best high schools in South Carolina

Stacker

#30. Murrells Inlet

- Typical home value: $376,201 - 1-year price change: +10.5% - 5-year price change: +65.5% - Metro area: Georgetown, SC

Stacker

#29. North Myrtle Beach

- Typical home value: $385,868 - 1-year price change: +11.6% - 5-year price change: +79.3% - Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC

Stacker

#28. Saint Helena Island

- Typical home value: $394,021 - 1-year price change: +12.9% - 5-year price change: +69.2% - Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

Stacker

#27. Huger

- Typical home value: $399,748 - 1-year price change: +6.4% - 5-year price change: +63.3% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#26. Chapin

- Typical home value: $417,606 - 1-year price change: +10.6% - 5-year price change: +61.7% - Metro area: Columbia, SC

You may also like: Counties with the most college graduates in South Carolina

Stacker

#25. Hollywood

- Typical home value: $431,522 - 1-year price change: +11.0% - 5-year price change: +61.7% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#24. Pinopolis

- Typical home value: $431,735 - 1-year price change: +7.9% - 5-year price change: +51.1% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#23. Surfside Beach

- Typical home value: $446,345 - 1-year price change: +8.5% - 5-year price change: +67.6% - Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC

Stacker

#22. Bluffton

- Typical home value: $456,945 - 1-year price change: +13.1% - 5-year price change: +65.0% - Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

Stacker

#21. Fort Mill

- Typical home value: $463,940 - 1-year price change: +8.0% - 5-year price change: +57.2% - Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC

You may also like: South Carolina is the #4 state with the lowest Black homeownership gap

Stacker

#20. Salem

- Typical home value: $474,477 - 1-year price change: +10.5% - 5-year price change: +96.0% - Metro area: Seneca, SC

Stacker

#19. Ravenel

- Typical home value: $476,756 - 1-year price change: +8.9% - 5-year price change: +61.8% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#18. Pawleys Island

- Typical home value: $479,560 - 1-year price change: +10.9% - 5-year price change: +62.9% - Metro area: Georgetown, SC

Stacker

#17. Charleston

- Typical home value: $483,715 - 1-year price change: +10.7% - 5-year price change: +55.0% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#16. Tega Cay

- Typical home value: $518,758 - 1-year price change: +7.4% - 5-year price change: +54.8% - Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC

You may also like: Colleges with the best ROI in South Carolina

Stacker

#15. Wadmalaw Island

- Typical home value: $549,028 - 1-year price change: +16.4% - 5-year price change: +76.4% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#14. Awendaw

- Typical home value: $592,514 - 1-year price change: +9.9% - 5-year price change: +52.4% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#13. Edisto Beach

- Typical home value: $611,496 - 1-year price change: +13.0% - 5-year price change: +76.6% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#12. Okatie

- Typical home value: $627,175 - 1-year price change: +15.8% - 5-year price change: +65.0% - Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

Stacker

#11. Meggett

- Typical home value: $660,289 - 1-year price change: +10.8% - 5-year price change: +72.8% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

You may also like: Best colleges in South Carolina

Stacker

#10. Hilton Head Island

- Typical home value: $702,660 - 1-year price change: +11.5% - 5-year price change: +73.4% - Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

Stacker

#9. Mount Pleasant

- Typical home value: $702,752 - 1-year price change: +11.5% - 5-year price change: +57.1% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#8. Briarcliffe Acres

- Typical home value: $764,272 - 1-year price change: +4.1% - 5-year price change: +69.0% - Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC

Stacker

#7. Seabrook Island

- Typical home value: $809,153 - 1-year price change: +18.0% - 5-year price change: +85.5% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#6. Sunset

- Typical home value: $999,166 - 1-year price change: +17.1% - 5-year price change: +112.2% - Metro area: Greenville-Anderson, SC

You may also like: Highest rated IPAs in South Carolina

Stacker

#5. Folly Beach

- Typical home value: $1,239,179 - 1-year price change: +12.9% - 5-year price change: +89.2% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#4. Isle of Palms

- Typical home value: $1,385,341 - 1-year price change: +14.3% - 5-year price change: +85.4% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#3. Kiawah Island

- Typical home value: $1,632,685 - 1-year price change: +16.0% - 5-year price change: +69.4% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

Stacker

#2. Sheldon

- Typical home value: $2,188,793 - 1-year price change: +6.7% - 5-year price change: +47.3% - Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton, SC

Stacker

#1. Sullivans Island

- Typical home value: $3,350,850 - 1-year price change: +13.1% - 5-year price change: +98.2% - Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston, SC

You may also like: Highest-earning cities in South Carolina

Myrtle Beach buys up more land for larger downtown redevelopment project

Save two vacant lots, the city now owns all of the property on three blocks from Kings Highway to Flagg Street between 7th and 8th avenues north.The $3 million three-parcel purchase Tuesday totals about $33 million the city of Myrtle Beach has invested in the downtown area since December 2021.The two lots not owned by the city on the three blocks are an old go-kart track and a vacant lot, both owned by Burroughs & Chapin. All of the land is next to the 10.6-acre site of the former Myrtle Beach Pavilion and Amusement Park, a...

Save two vacant lots, the city now owns all of the property on three blocks from Kings Highway to Flagg Street between 7th and 8th avenues north.

The $3 million three-parcel purchase Tuesday totals about $33 million the city of Myrtle Beach has invested in the downtown area since December 2021.

The two lots not owned by the city on the three blocks are an old go-kart track and a vacant lot, both owned by Burroughs & Chapin. All of the land is next to the 10.6-acre site of the former Myrtle Beach Pavilion and Amusement Park, also owned by Burroughs & Chapin. The old Pavilion site is where the Carolina Country Music Fest is held each summer.

Two of the three parcels the city committed to buying on Tuesday are vacant lots. The city bought the pair of vacant lots for $1 million.

The third, 708 Kings Highway, is where White Sands Motel stands. The city bought it for $2 million and has agreed to lease the structure to White Sands Motel business owner Bouchra Baihoum for eight months at $2,500 a month.

Baihoum said the sale was something the city wanted, rather than herself.

“The city wants it, so I have to sell it,” she said. “If the lease could have been longer than that, I would really appreciate it. Because I spent more than 20 years paying off payments, and I was hoping to do something else on this property.”

White Sands Motel is sandwiched between the recently purchased Subway restaurant and Auto Money Title Loans. The city is also leasing those structures to the business owners.

Assistant City Manager Brian Tucker said Tuesday’s purchase is the final piece to move ahead with a larger redevelopment plan for the city.

The land acquisitions began in December 2021 with the city buying 10 parcels in the downtown area.

“Those 10 parcels that we bought at that point were a primary and public safety concern,” Tucker said. “As we evaluated the redevelopment opportunity, we recognized it would be more impactful if we were able to assemble a larger contiguous piece for a larger redevelopment property project. So that's, we've been, we've been working toward that since then.”

Many of the buildings the city bought between 7th and 8th avenues north from Kings Highway to Flagg Street have been demolished including restaurants Bodo’s and Barnacle Bill’s Rum & Raw Bar, and motels Fountainbleau Inn, Sea Palms, the Sea Nymph and Oasis. Left standing and being leased include Nathan’s Famous Hotdogs and Scoops Ice Cream, Midtown Inn and Bombay at the Beach.

“I would imagine many of those structured structures would be demolished, similarly to what we have done with some of the older hotels that have already been taken down,” Tucker said of the White Sands Motel, Subway and Auto Money Title Loans.

With Tuesday’s purchase, the city owns all of the block from Kings Highway to Chester Street between 7th and 8th avenues north. It’s 4.35 acres.

The city owns most of the block from Chester Street to York Street between the avenues except the .24 acre old for-kart track. The city’s land on that block is 1.81 acres.

The city also owns most of the block between the avenues from Flagg Street to York Street totaling 1.11 acres. The remaining lot on Flagg Street, a .24-acre vacant lot, is owned by Burroughs & Chapin.

The purchases connect property between avenues reaching to the buildings facing Ocean Boulevard up to the Arts and Innovation District across Kings Highway.

City staff has repeated the area was targeted because it has been in decline for more than 20 years with deteriorating buildings that has deterred businesses from investing in the city’s traditional center.

Tucker has said the connecting property and location to the ocean is what creates a magnet to developers since they would only have to negotiate a price with the city rather than with multiple property owners. And, he added, it gives the city more control in picking what goes on the property when developers submit bids and plans.

The city has not released the names of interested developers, but Tucker said plans may include anything from retail to residential projects.

The process began when the city passed its master plan in 2019. That created a blueprint for future development. Pages of the plan are filled with drawings of what the area could look like if it were revitalized and redeveloped.

The plans include the Arts and Innovation District fronted by the Nance Plaza fountain across Kings Highway from Subway, White Sands Motel and Auto Money Title Loans. The city bolstered the master plan with an update in 2020. The city defined the Oceanfront Redevelopment Project as 14th Avenue South to 22nd Avenue North and created a special tax district within the area.

Throughout the city limits, and beyond, the city of Myrtle Beach owns more than 1,040 acres, according to Horry County land records. The city’s property includes numerous public parks, Whispering Pines Golf Club, cemeteries, the Myrtle Beach Convention Center, ball fields, beachfront parking, dog parks, the Boardwalk, campgrounds, police and fire departments, drainage ponds, buildings in the Arts and Innovation District, easements and land adjoining the Burroughs & Chapin property downtown.

In the land records, there’s the 20-acre Pelicans Ballpark site the city owns with Horry County. There’s also a 0.87-acre tract near Lee’s Landing off S.C. 90 listed as a radio and beacon site. There’s a 0.32-acre site straddling the city limits of North Myrtle Beach and Briarcliffe Acres listed as a well site.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.