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When you choose Lowco Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the very best:

Experience

Lowco Roofing is a family-owned and operated business with over 30 years of roofing experience. There's no roofing project too small or large for our team to handle. We've seen and done it all, from major roof replacements to preventative roofing maintenance. When combined with our customer service, material selection, and available warranties, our experience sets us apart from other roofing contractors.

Reputation

Lowco Roofing has earned the respect and admiration of our customers by delivering the best craftsmanship and overall customer satisfaction. Our team is happy to assist you with any questions you have. Whether you need a roof inspection for your new home or have questions about roofing shingles, we're here to serve you.

Selection

From shingles, metal, and tile to commercial flat roofing, Lowco Roofing has the product lines and expertise to complete your job correctly, on time, and within your budget. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, we offer the largest selection of shingle styles and products from the most trusted name in shingle manufacturers.

Warranty Coverage

As roofing experts, we know that warranties are important to our customers. That's why we offer the best product warranties around, including lifetime warranties on our shingles. With these warranties in place, you can have peace of mind knowing that your roof protects what matters most in your life.

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The benefits of Lowco roof installations include:

It might seem obvious, but replacing an old roof is a safe, responsible decision for your family. This is especially true if you know for sure that your current roof is in bad shape.

Safety

Be the envy of your neighborhood! Replacing your old which makes your home look great and can increase the value of your property when it's time to sell.

Enhanced Curb Appeal

Installing a new roof is often a more energy-efficient option than keeping your old one. As a bonus, many homeowners enjoy lower utility and energy bills when replacing their roofs.

Energy Efficient

Because Lowco Roofing uses top-quality roofing materials and shingles from Owens Corning, you can be confident your roof will last for years.

Long-Lasting

There are many reasons why you might want to consider replacing your roof, but most often, the choice stems from necessity. But how do you know when it's time to replace instead of repair?

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Let Us Show You the Lowco Difference

There's a reason why so many South Carolina homeowners turn to Lowco for roofing services. Sure, we could talk about our accolades and how we're better than other roofing companies. But the truth is, we'd prefer to show you with hard work and fair pricing.

From roof repairs to roof replacement, there's no better company to trust than Lowco Roofing. We have the expertise, experience, products, and tools to get the job done right, no matter your roofing problem. We'll work with you to select the best materials for your roofing needs and budget, and we'll make sure the job is done right from start to finish.

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Latest News in Red Hill, SC

Drake Maye throws 2 TDs, No. 21 North Carolina has 9 sacks in 31-17 win over South Carolina

Duke’s Mayo ClassicFinal 1234TUNC71014031SC770317South Carolina Gamecocks0-117Pass...

Duke’s Mayo Classic

Final

1234T
UNC71014031
SC770317

South Carolina Gamecocks

0-1

17

Passing Yards

UNCSC

30-39, 353 YDS

Rushing Yards

UNCSC

12 CAR, 23 YDS, 1 TD

Receiving Yards

UNC

7 REC, 66 YDS, 1 TDSC

UNC

SC

UNC 100%

UNC 31SC 17

0:00 - 4thEnd of 4th Quarter

According to ESPN Analytics

Team Stats

Total Yards

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32:37

27:23

Full Team Stats

Bank of America Stadium

4:30 PM, September 2, 2023Coverage: ABC

Charlotte, NC

Line: UNC -2.5

Over/Under: 62.5

Attendance: 68,723

TeamCONFOVR
Florida State8-013-1
Louisville7-110-4
NC State6-29-4
Georgia Tech5-37-6
Virginia Tech5-37-6
Clemson4-49-4
North Carolina4-48-5
Duke4-48-5
Miami3-57-6
Boston College3-57-6
Syracuse2-66-7
Pittsburgh2-63-9
Virginia2-63-9
Wake Forest1-74-8
TeamCONFOVR
Georgia8-013-1
Missouri6-211-2
Tennessee4-49-4
Kentucky3-57-6
Florida3-55-7
South Carolina3-55-7
Vanderbilt0-82-10
TeamCONFOVR
Alabama8-012-2
Ole Miss6-211-2
LSU6-210-3
Texas A&M4-47-6
Auburn3-56-7
Mississippi State1-75-7
Arkansas1-74-8

Iron Hill Brewery and Restaurant opens Columbia location

Iron Hill Brewery and Restaurant officially opened its doors to the public in Columbia at 11 a.m. on June 22, receiving an enthusiastic response as the newest tenant of Columbia’s growing BullStreet District. The 7,500-square-foot locations features the company’s brewing facility, a bar and cocktail area, dining room and dog-friendly outdoor patio.The new Iron Hill is located at 945 Sabal St. and will be open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Sunda...

Iron Hill Brewery and Restaurant officially opened its doors to the public in Columbia at 11 a.m. on June 22, receiving an enthusiastic response as the newest tenant of Columbia’s growing BullStreet District. The 7,500-square-foot locations features the company’s brewing facility, a bar and cocktail area, dining room and dog-friendly outdoor patio.

The new Iron Hill is located at 945 Sabal St. and will be open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Sunday. In addition to dine-in service, online ordering, take out, delivery and beer to go will also be available.

This is the Delaware-based company’s 21st location and joins additional southern Iron Hill locations, including Greenville, which opened in 2018.

“We are thrilled to open our newest location in the heart of downtown Columbia and become an integral part of the area,” said Iron Hill CEO Chris Westcott. “We chose the midlands as our second South Carolina location for many reasons. Once we saw the development plans for the BullStreet District, we knew this was the right spot to open our newest Iron Hill location.”

Officials from Iron Hill partnered with Bray Architecture to design the new brewery and restaurant.

Iron Hill features award-winning beers brewed on site. Selections will include signature beers as well as seasonal offerings. Iron Hill honors each of its locations with its Hometown Tap program, and in Columbia will brew and regularly offer Soda City Pils, a pilsner exclusive to the Columbia market.

The menu features appetizers and soups, burgers and sandwiches, hearth-baked pizzas, salads, other entrees and items inspired by Iron Hill’s beers, including the Grilled Brewben Sandwich with Vienna Red Lager bacon sauerkraut and the VooDoo Chicken Pizza with Vienna Red Lager barbecue sauce. In addition to the core menu, Iron Hill Columbia’s head chef will craft a rotating selection of fresh “Chef’s Table Features to offer even more variety and selection.

Iron Hill is the second restaurant in the BullStreet District, joining Publico at BullStreet. Other tenants in the developing 181-acre District include REI Co-Op, Starbucks, Capgemini, Founders Federal Credit Union, Robinson Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC, Elliott Davis and Segra Park, home of the Columbia Fireflies.

Iron Hill partnered with Bray Architecture to design the new brewery and restaurant to reflect the modern color palette and welcoming floor plan of their newest location. Iron Hill is situated at a main entrance of the BullStreet District, is located one mile from the University of South Carolina campus and the S.C. State House and is within walking distance of multiple historic neighborhoods and large employers.

Man makes his dream of a small park in his hometown a reality

Stokes Legacy Park has been open for almost a year but, David Stokes Jr. says he wants more people to know it's here and he plans to continue adding equipment.More VideosCASSATT, S.C. — David Stokes Jr. is a lifelong resident of the rural community of Cassatt.The unincorporated area of the town is located between Camden and Bethune and only has one intersection, but it's home to many like Stokes. In 2007, he bought land from another resid...

Stokes Legacy Park has been open for almost a year but, David Stokes Jr. says he wants more people to know it's here and he plans to continue adding equipment.

More Videos

CASSATT, S.C. — David Stokes Jr. is a lifelong resident of the rural community of Cassatt.

The unincorporated area of the town is located between Camden and Bethune and only has one intersection, but it's home to many like Stokes. In 2007, he bought land from another resident back and decided to transform the space into a community park called, "Stokes Legacy Park" which he says he named after his father, who he says was a good man.

"A vision, you know I'm always one of those guys that I don't believe when a person tells me I can't do something or it's not a good idea, I do it anyway because it's in my heart," says Stokes Jr., Park Creator.

Stokes Jr. used to play baseball with those in the community and they would go from park to park each week,, including the land that he purchased. He eventually decided he wanted to make it a permanent place and when the site became available, he developed it.

RELATED: Kershaw County preparing for citizen input on recreation

"I said well once I get some property I'm going to build one and it's not going anywhere, we don't have to changing you know back and forth and depending on other people to do things," he added.

The site has turned into more than a baseball field: it now has a basketball court, swings, slides, and even a building with a fireplace on the outside. But Stokes Jr. says there is more work to be done.

RELATED: Community arts project encourages youth retention in Calhoun County

"The biggest thing for the children, I'm trying to find a nice playground or whatever for 5-12 to play on so that's one of my next big issues," he adds.

He wants those nearby to come to relax and have fun rather than having to drive 10 to 20 minutes in either direction to Camden or Bethune.

"There's not a park anywhere close, so for someone to do that to give them something other than staying at home and playing on video games, they're just so happy about it," says Tracy Paul, Owner of HWY1 Cafe, located right in front of the park.

"It means a lot for the kids, he works with the kids out there cleaning the land, and they all helping him towards it," adds Resident Tony Wilson.

Stokes Jr. says those who come must follow the rules listed on the gate when entering.

The park is located at 1912 Red Hill Church Road, Cassatt, SC, 29032.

South Carolina-to-Jacksonville pipeline could use old eminent domain laws to take needed land

SAVANNAH | Energy giant Kinder Morgan plans to build its Palmetto Pipeline across 210 miles of Georgia to tie into an existing pipeline and bring gasoline and diesel from the Gulf Coast and ethanol from South Carolina to terminals in North Augusta, S.C., Richmond Hill, Ga., and Jacksonville.Petroleum pipelines have a peculiar past in Georgia. Their history was built on support of national defense in World War II and altered in the 1990s by angry and influential plantation owners.Now, a new chapter that's unfolded...

SAVANNAH | Energy giant Kinder Morgan plans to build its Palmetto Pipeline across 210 miles of Georgia to tie into an existing pipeline and bring gasoline and diesel from the Gulf Coast and ethanol from South Carolina to terminals in North Augusta, S.C., Richmond Hill, Ga., and Jacksonville.

Petroleum pipelines have a peculiar past in Georgia. Their history was built on support of national defense in World War II and altered in the 1990s by angry and influential plantation owners.

Now, a new chapter that's unfolded with a series of bureaucratic missteps is testing a 20-year-old Georgia law for only the second time.

As currently mapped, the pipeline would affect 396 landowners over a dozen Georgia counties as it snakes along the Savannah River and down the coast to Florida.

The vast majority is private property. Kinder Morgan will try to reach agreements with landowners for one-time payments for the perpetual use of a 50-foot-wide strip of their land. Landowners will retain ownership and continue to pay property taxes on the land.

Where they don't agree and the pipeline can't be re-routed, Kinder Morgan will need to condemn property through eminent domain.

That issue is at the heart of the Georgia law on petroleum pipelines that proof of a public need is necessary to secure the right to exercise eminent domain. But it wasn't always that way.

Pipeline companies won the right to condemn property to protect the homeland in World War II, said Joe Tanner, of Joe Tanner and Associates, an environmental consulting and lobbying firm in Atlanta.

"They were given right of eminent domain way back then," said Tanner, a former director of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

'RED HILL PLANTATIONS'

The law stayed that way until an effort to build across Georgia's "red hill plantations,'' Tanner said.

Georgia actually resisted pre-war efforts to construct two pipelines that eventually ran as far north as North Carolina, according to a history recounted in a 2015 University of Iowa Law Review article, "Transporting Oil and Gas: U.S. Infrastructure Challenges."

Georgia lawmakers were protecting the interests of the railroads, but heightened national security concerns wouldn't allow them to continue to do so for long. In July 1941, even before the U.S. entered the war, Congress passed the Cole Act, which gave interstate pipelines the power of eminent domain in cases where the president determined it necessary for national defense.

Two pipelines crossing Georgia were built in 1941 and 1942. Two other pipelines, the Big Inch and Little Big Inch running from Texas oil wells through refineries in the Midwest and ultimately to the East Coast were crucial to the war effort.

Federal eminent domain authority for oil pipelines expired in 1943, and condemnation rights reverted to the states. It's now governed by a hodgepodge of state laws, many of them - including those of Florida and South Carolina - granting petroleum pipelines nearly the same blanket authority that the federal government gave as it braced for a world war.

PECANS AND QUAILS

That's where Georgia law stood until 1993, when a pipeline running through the Fort Valley pecan orchard of a state representative leaked thousand of gallons of gasoline, fouling his well.

The pipeline's owner, Colonial Pipeline, also was planning to route a new pipeline through the Red Hills region, home to quail plantations and their wealthy owners.

That proved unwise.

In response to the leaks, the General Assembly placed a year-long moratorium on pipeline companies' eminent domain right. And then-Gov. Zell Miller gave Tanner the task of working with landowners to come up with legislation limiting the rights of pipeline companies once the moratorium expired.

Tanner recalled that pipeline companies were accustomed to getting what they wanted with little resistance.

"The president of one of the companies came up on Capitol Hill and asked to see me. I went in, and he almost accosted me, saying 'Who the hell do you think you are? This is a national defense issue.'"

During World War II it was, Tanner replied, but no longer.

"That's when they revoked eminent domain," Tanner said. "[The pipeline executive] got religion in working out the final compromise."

That compromise gave the pipeline companies two regulatory hoops to jump through before they could condemn property. They must get a certificate of need from the Georgia Department of Transportation and a permit from the Environmental Protection Division.

These rules apply only to petroleum pipelines. The siting of interstate natural gas pipelines is governed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

Tanner, whose company has offered its services to Kinder Morgan, sees the use of eminent domain as inevitable in this case.

OUTDATED DATA

On Feb. 13, Kinder Morgan applied for its certificate of need from the Georgia DOT, making it only the second company to test this procedure.

After public outcry and a consultation with the Georgia attorney general's office, the DOT announced it would conduct one public hearing, the minimum required by law. It's scheduled for April 21 in Richmond Hill near where the pipeline makes its right turn toward Florida.

In a letter dated March 18, DOT deputy Commissioner Todd Long requested more information from Kinder Morgan to justify the need for its pipeline.

But some of what Long requested was already available publicly, such as the pipeline capacity, which the company has said repeatedly will be 167,000 barrels per day. Long also asked the amount and percentage of petroleum that would be made available to Georgians. Kinder Morgan has stated at its open houses, the transcripts of which were submitted to DOT, that the Richmond Hill terminal will be able to handle 25,000 barrels per day.

At a recent meeting and in a discussion with the Savannah Morning News earlier this month, company executives upped the volume estimate of what's ultimately to be delivered to Georgia markets in the Augusta, Savannah and Jacksonville areas from 50% to 60% of the pipeline's capacity.

What Kinder Morgan hasn't offered, and DOT hasn't openly requested, is evidence the pipeline will increase competition, decrease prices, produce a net increase in jobs or provide a safety net for gasoline supply in Georgia.

The only other application for a needs certificate - the one ultimately granted to Colonial Pipeline in 2007 - gave details of the cost savings of that pipeline, indicating it would beat then-available shipping and trucking by 10 cents per gallon.

No such specificity has been provided by Kinder Morgan. And some of what the company has provided appears to be outdated.

"Currently, marine transport is the only source of supply to Savannah and Jacksonville markets," the company wrote in its application, explaining that the pipeline would minimize the effects of a hurricane on the gasoline supply to Savannah.

That's no longer how Savannah gets its gasoline, said Chad Gleaton, Savannah terminal manager for Associated Petroleum Carriers, a trucking company.

For about four years, trucking gasoline from inland terminals in Macon and North Augusta has been the nearly exclusive means of getting the product to the pump for a competitive price.

"I'd say out of 100 gallons of fuel 95 are pulled from alternate terminals," Gleaton said. "Before that it was just the opposite. It's been wonderful for us. It's created a market we never knew existed. If the trucks ever stop coming, the Savannah economy is going to be affected tremendously."

'SHOW ME THE MONEY'

Kinder Morgan's estimates of delivery volumes to Georgia markets come with the caveat that the company doesn't control the actions of its shippers. But it also refuses to reveal who its shippers are or what tariffs they'll pay, citing confidentiality agreements.

In an interview with the Savannah Morning News, Kinder Morgan executives Allen Fore and Brian Williams again declined to provide the tariffs. Tariff information would only become public after the pipeline is in operation, they said.

"If you have an additional supply that wasn't there before and there's a competitive choice and options for gas stations or whatever it may be, that should have a positive impact on prices," said Fore, vice president for public affairs. "It should, but there are a lot of other market influences that are way beyond our control that we can't guarantee that."

CRITICS ZERO IN

Critics say the only way to analyze whether prices would decrease is to compare the pipeline's rates to current transportation options. The tariff schedule submitted to federal regulators outlined a tiered system that favors high volume over low but didn't indicate actual rates.

"They're asking for the most intrusive government power that's out there, to take private land, and they don't feel obligated to give us the details of their pricing structure?" asked Ryan Chandler, vice president for business development at Savannah-based Colonial Group Inc., which is not affiliated with Alpharetta-based Colonial Pipeline Company.

The 25,000 barrels per day promised for a Richmond Hill terminal outstrips the Savannah metropolitan area's 20,000 barrel per day consumption, Chandler said.

Moreover, demand is down 15 percent statewide from a peak in 2005 to 2012, according to the federal Energy Information Administration. That trend is expected to continue. And shippers are likely to bypass Savannah in favor of the Jacksonville market where they can make more money.

A check of prices on April 6 indicated the lowest wholesale pre-tax price for branded gas in Jacksonville was $1.6716 a gallon compared to $1.6235 in Savannah. In a business that scrutinizes price to the fourth decimal place, that's a huge difference, Chandler said.

He said he fears that big oil, particularly ExxonMobil, co-owner of the existing Plantation Pipeline the Palmetto will connect into, will be able to control the supply chain into Savannah and ultimately force out competition.

"How is it our state would ever be interested to allow a Texas company to disadvantage Georgia companies, expose Georgia jobs to risk and potentially create a fuel supply monopoly dominated by big oil companies out of Texas?" asked Chandler, whose company already competes with about two dozen marketers in getting gasoline into Savannah, handling up to 15 percent of the market share.

Steve Caley, an attorney with Atlanta-based GreenLaw, which represents environmental interests in the pipeline discussion, also finds the data vacuum troubling. It cripples public participation in evaluating Georgians' need for the pipeline, he said.

"Show me the money," Caley said. "Not only should it be disclosed to DOT, but the public has the right to comment on the application. How can you comment if you're not given the basic information?"

8 Most Affordable Myrtle Beach Suburbs to Live In

Myrtle Beach, SC, “The Grand Strand,” is swiftly becoming home for many South Carolinians and out-of-staters alike. This Southeastern city is known for many things including its seasonal tourism as well as lots of beaches, nightlife options, and golf courses.If you’re moving to or ...

Myrtle Beach, SC, “The Grand Strand,” is swiftly becoming home for many South Carolinians and out-of-staters alike. This Southeastern city is known for many things including its seasonal tourism as well as lots of beaches, nightlife options, and golf courses.

If you’re moving to or living in Myrtle Beach, know that the housing market is not very competitive, the median home sale price is $261,200, and the average sale price per square foot is $234. And if you’re a renter, the average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Myrtle Beach is about $1,760.

If those numbers are out of your budget, don’t worry. We’ve collected the 8 most affordable Myrtle Beach suburbs to consider moving to. And the best part is that they’re all less than 35 minutes away from the city center. That way you can live close to Myrtle Beach and all its awesome activities without paying the premium price of owning a home or renting an apartment there.

#1: Red Hill

Median home price: $252,228 Average sale price per square foot: $171 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 20 minutes Red Hill, SC homes for sale Red Hill, SC apartments for rent

With a median home sale price of $252,228, Red Hill takes the number one spot on our list of affordable Myrtle Beach suburbs. About a 20-minute drive away from downtown Myrtle Beach, Red Hill is home to roughly 15,900 residents. If you’re considering moving to this area make sure to golf at one of the many golf courses.

Median home price: $260,000 Average sale price per square foot: $181 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 25 minutes Conway, SC homes for sale Conway, SC apartments for rent

Taking the second place on our list is Conway. About a 25-minute drive away from downtown Myrtle Beach, you can spend the day at one of the many beaches in just a quick drive. Some popular things to do in Conway include exploring the Conway Riverwalk and taking a tour of Horry County Museum. When living in this suburb of 24,800 people, you can also spend the day checking out the charming downtown.

#3: Socastee

Median home price: $287,020 Average sale price per square foot: $169 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 15 minutes Socastee, SC homes for sale Socastee, SC apartments for rent

With a median home sale price of $287,020 and only a 15-minute drive from Myrtle Beach, Socastee is next up. Even with a population of about 22,200, there are plenty of cool things to check out in Socastee. If you find yourself moving to the third most affordable suburb, make sure to take in the views at Swing Bridge Park.

#4: Little River

Median home price: $307,880 Average sale price per square foot: $192 Average rent for a 2-bedroom apartment: $1,733 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 35 minutes Little River, SC homes for sale Little River, SC apartments for rent

Only slightly more expensive than Socastee is none other than Little River. There are several top attractions you may want to check out in Myrtle Beach suburb. Make sure to have a meal at one of the waterfront restaurants or golf at the courses.

#5: Garden City

Median home price: $332,000 Average sale price per square foot: $221 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 20 minutes Garden City, SC homes for sale Garden City, SC apartments for rent

Only a 20-minute drive into the city, consider adding Garden City to your list of Myrtle Beach suburbs to consider moving to. With 10,200 people living in this affordable town, Garden City is a great option to consider when looking to stay close to Myrtle Beach without paying the premium for a home in the city. Living in Garden City, you can walk along the pier, golf, or grab a meal at one of the great local restaurants.

#6: Forestbrook

Median home price: $355,000 Average sale price per square foot: $180 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 12 minutes Forestbrook, SC homes for sale Forestbrook, SC apartments for rent

Sixth on the list is another well-known Myrtle Beach suburb is Forestbrook, where you’ll find the home prices are $355,000. Forestbrook has about 6,700 residents and is a great suburb to consider living in. Whether you visit a local park or pick up a pastry at a local bakery, there’s many cool things to do and see in this suburb.

#7: Litchfield Beach

Median home price: $370,000 Average sale price per square foot: $222 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 35 minutes Litchfield Beach, SC homes for sale Litchfield Beach, SC apartments for rent

Seventh on our list of affordable Myrtle Beach suburbs is Litchfield Beach, which is roughly a 35-minute drive into the heart of the city. With a population of nearly 8,400, living in Litchfield Beach is a great alternative to Myrtle Beach’s hustle and bustle. Don’t miss out on spending the day at one of the beaches like Litchfield Beach or Magnolia Beach, and exploring the downtown area once moving to the area.

#8: Murrells Inlet

Median home price: $387,500 Average sale price per square foot: $214 Driving distance from Myrtle Beach: 25 minutes Murrells Inlet, SC homes for sale Murrells Inlet, SC apartments for rent

Last but not least on our list of most affordable Myrtle Beach suburbs is Murrells Inlet. Just about 9,700 residents call this affordable suburb home, so you’ll have a fraction of Myrtle Beach’s population while remaining close to the city and its attractions. Once moving to Murrells Inlet you’ll want to stroll along the Murrells Inlet Marsh Walk, explore Huntington Beach State Park and check out Atalaya Castle, or spend the day at the beach.

Methodology: Affordability is based on whether a suburb’s median home sale price or average sale price per square foot is less than Myrtle Beach and under a 35-minute drive from downtown Myrtle Beach. Median home sale price data from the Redfin Data Center during March 2023. Average rental data from Rent.com March 2023. Population data sourced from the United States Census Bureau.

If you are represented by an agent, this is not a solicitation of your business. This article is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for professional advice from a medical provider, licensed attorney, financial advisor, or tax professional. Consumers should independently verify any agency or service mentioned will meet their needs. Learn more about our Editorial Guidelines here.

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