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When you choose Lowco Roofing, you can rest assured that you'll get the very best:

Experience

Lowco Roofing is a family-owned and operated business with over 30 years of roofing experience. There's no roofing project too small or large for our team to handle. We've seen and done it all, from major roof replacements to preventative roofing maintenance. When combined with our customer service, material selection, and available warranties, our experience sets us apart from other roofing contractors.

Reputation

Lowco Roofing has earned the respect and admiration of our customers by delivering the best craftsmanship and overall customer satisfaction. Our team is happy to assist you with any questions you have. Whether you need a roof inspection for your new home or have questions about roofing shingles, we're here to serve you.

Selection

From shingles, metal, and tile to commercial flat roofing, Lowco Roofing has the product lines and expertise to complete your job correctly, on time, and within your budget. As an Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, we offer the largest selection of shingle styles and products from the most trusted name in shingle manufacturers.

Warranty Coverage

As roofing experts, we know that warranties are important to our customers. That's why we offer the best product warranties around, including lifetime warranties on our shingles. With these warranties in place, you can have peace of mind knowing that your roof protects what matters most in your life.

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The benefits of Lowco roof installations include:

It might seem obvious, but replacing an old roof is a safe, responsible decision for your family. This is especially true if you know for sure that your current roof is in bad shape.

Safety

Be the envy of your neighborhood! Replacing your old which makes your home look great and can increase the value of your property when it's time to sell.

Enhanced Curb Appeal

Installing a new roof is often a more energy-efficient option than keeping your old one. As a bonus, many homeowners enjoy lower utility and energy bills when replacing their roofs.

Energy Efficient

Because Lowco Roofing uses top-quality roofing materials and shingles from Owens Corning, you can be confident your roof will last for years.

Long-Lasting

There are many reasons why you might want to consider replacing your roof, but most often, the choice stems from necessity. But how do you know when it's time to replace instead of repair?

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Let Us Show You the Lowco Difference

There's a reason why so many South Carolina homeowners turn to Lowco for roofing services. Sure, we could talk about our accolades and how we're better than other roofing companies. But the truth is, we'd prefer to show you with hard work and fair pricing.

From roof repairs to roof replacement, there's no better company to trust than Lowco Roofing. We have the expertise, experience, products, and tools to get the job done right, no matter your roofing problem. We'll work with you to select the best materials for your roofing needs and budget, and we'll make sure the job is done right from start to finish.

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Latest News in Conway, SC

Prepare for Trump’s event on Saturday: Where to park, what to bring and how to get tickets

Former President Donald Trump will host a “Get Out the Vote” rally on Saturday in Conway; here’s how to prepare.The event is being held at the Coastal Carolina University’s HTC Center, 104 Founders Drive, on Feb. 10. Doors open at 11 a.m. and close at 1 p.m. The presidential candidate is scheduled to begin speaking at 2 p.m.All attendees must register beforehand, which can be done on ...

Former President Donald Trump will host a “Get Out the Vote” rally on Saturday in Conway; here’s how to prepare.

The event is being held at the Coastal Carolina University’s HTC Center, 104 Founders Drive, on Feb. 10. Doors open at 11 a.m. and close at 1 p.m. The presidential candidate is scheduled to begin speaking at 2 p.m.

All attendees must register beforehand, which can be done on Trump’s website. Tickets are first come first serve and there is a maximum of two tickets per phone number.

Thousands of people could go as the HTC Center has the capacity for 3,000 people, according to CCU Director of Communications Jerry Rashid.

The Sun News emailed Trump’s press team for more information. The email had not been returned at time of publication.

Rashid said the parking lots surrounds the HTC building will not be available as Founders Drive between Chanticleer Drive and Highway 544 will be closed. The GG and KK lots will be open along with other parking lots around campus.

Some parking lots will have restricted access so be prepared to walk across campus. You can find a parking map here.

Rashid recommends showing up early to ease traffic congestion and secure a parking spot. Trump’s arrival may also shut down highways.

It would be smart to pack a meal or bring snacks. Doors open at 11 a.m. and Trump is supposed to begin speaking at 2 p.m. If you arrive early, you could be at the rally for over four hours, and that doesn’t include the time it takes dealing with traffic before and after the event.

Cash or a credit card is also a good item to keep with you as Rashid said there will be food vendors at the rally. There will likely be Trump merchandise available for purchase.

You can bring a water bottle but make sure it’s not a thermos, like a Stanley Cup or a Hydro Flask as those are not allowed inside. At the Nikki Haley rally, opened drinks, such as ones from Starbucks, could not be brought inside.

The Secret Service has a long list of banned items, which includes large backpacks, firearms, glass, thermal or metal containers, coolers and selfie sticks. To enter the building, you will need to go through security. Security teams will search your bag before you enter and put you through a metal detector.

According to the Secret Service website, these are all items it prohibits:

• Aerosols

• Ammunition

• Animals other than service/guide animals

• Backpacks and bags exceeding size restrictions (18 inches by 13 inches by 7 inches)

• Bicycles

• Balloons

• Coolers

• Drones and other unmanned aircraft systems

• Explosives

• Firearms

• Flammable liquids

• Glass, thermal, or metal containers

• Laser pointers

• Mace / Pepper spray

• Packages

• Recreational motorized mobility devices

• Selfie Sticks

• Signs exceeding the size restrictions (20 feet x 3 feet x 1/4 inch)

• Structures

• Supports for signs and placards

• Toy guns

• Weapons of any kind

• Any other items determined to be potential safety hazards

This story was originally published February 8, 2024, 5:00 AM.

No trick: SC city changes its name to Halloween, gives boost to businesses

CONWAY — Tony Zack did a quick doubletake as he rounded the corner of Laurel Street and Second Avenue during his Monday evening walk.Why was a 10-foot skeleton standing beside the city planning office? By the time he noticed the plastic pumpkin-laden trees and the 12-foot grim reaper scarecrow, it clicked: Conway was again dressing up as Halloween.“They named the city Halloween,” said Zack, who has lived in Conway for about 17 years. “I know it was just (a stunt, but) it’s a lot of fun. It’s ...

CONWAY — Tony Zack did a quick doubletake as he rounded the corner of Laurel Street and Second Avenue during his Monday evening walk.

Why was a 10-foot skeleton standing beside the city planning office? By the time he noticed the plastic pumpkin-laden trees and the 12-foot grim reaper scarecrow, it clicked: Conway was again dressing up as Halloween.

“They named the city Halloween,” said Zack, who has lived in Conway for about 17 years. “I know it was just (a stunt, but) it’s a lot of fun. It’s just different.”

Rebranding Conway as the city of Halloween is also lucrative. What started as a gimmick by local officials last year to generate some seasonal buzz morphed into a monthlong celebration that provided a boost in fall tourism to the city of 27,000-plus.

Conway officials reported an 18 percent average increase in retail and restaurant sales, and a nearly 6 percent increase in hospitality revenue. The city’s downtown saw more than 20 times the number of visitors that it did the previous October.

“This little thing that we did that really didn’t cost us anything was huge for the city,” said City Administrator Adam Emrick, who is scheduled to speak next month at the International City/County Management Association conference in Austin, Texas. His session is titled “Halloween, South Carolina: How we won October.”

Unlike South Carolina’s tourism engine on the coast, Conway, which sits about 15 miles outside Myrtle Beach, doesn’t see big summer crowds. For many beachbound tourists, the city is essentially a gas stop on the way to the ocean.

Recognizing Conway’s peak tourism season runs from September through May, city officials in recent years refocused their marketing, promoting events in the fall, winter and spring.

“When we made that change, it changed everything for us as a downtown and we have seen so many returns on those investments, and we want to continue to do that,” said Hillary Howard, executive director of Conway Downtown Alive, which promotes city tourism. “We want people to be proud of where they live. We want people to come visit them because they live in Conway, not because they’re close to the beach.”

The idea for a seasonal rebranding emerged in January 2022 when Emrick was planning the city’s fall events.

Conway had already enhanced its decorating by placing hundreds of plastic jack-o-lanterns in trees in 2019 and later hanging black hats over the fountain beside City Hall to create a “witches’ garden.”

“We were trying to figure out how we were going to up the ante,” Emrick said. “We just couldn’t figure out what we were going to do. What are we going to do to make it more?”

Emrick had previously tweaked the design of the city logo, adding ghosts and bats to make it look like a haunted house for October promotions. He started the same task again, this time looking for something more powerful, something iconic. On a whim, he substituted the city’s name with Halloween.

“That looks awesome,” he remembers thinking. “What if we did that?”

He asked other city staff and they liked the idea. Then he called the mayor. She was in, too.

For the month of October, Conway would be called Halloween.

With everyone on board, Emrick began planning what he dubbed Project October. The idea wasn’t just to temporarily change the city’s name, but to build a calendar of community events focused on the season. The goal was to encourage businesses and nonprofits to join in the fun, so it wasn’t just a bunch of city-sponsored festivities.

City officials asked the organizer of the Christmas boat parade to offer a Halloween boat parade. They went to First United Methodist Church and asked them to plan an event around the church’s pumpkin patch. The chamber of commerce’s annual meeting even took on a Halloween theme.

City officials also looked for gaps in the schedule. Where there were voids, they scheduled movie showings and created a haunted trail called the Forest of Fear.

“I do think downtown Conway does lend itself to the spooky season with our live oak trees and our dripping Spanish moss and our spooky alleyways,” said Howard of Conway Downtown Alive. “It just lends itself to this type of décor, so why not play up on the assets you have, right?”

Baseball at the Beach Set for Opening Weekend

CONWAY, S.C. – The Coastal Carolina baseball team will open up its 2024 season with the Baseball at the Beach on Opening Weekend, Feb. 16-18, at Springs Brooks Stadium.SCHEDULE Friday, Feb. 16 11 a.m. ET – Duke vs. Indiana 4 p.m. ET – George Mason vs. Coastal Carolina (ESPN+ / 105.5 FM Hank)Saturday, Feb. 17 11 a.m. ET – George Mason vs. Duke 3 p.m. ET – Indiana vs. Coastal Carolina (ESPN+ / WRNN Hot Talk 99.5 FM)...

CONWAY, S.C. – The Coastal Carolina baseball team will open up its 2024 season with the Baseball at the Beach on Opening Weekend, Feb. 16-18, at Springs Brooks Stadium.

SCHEDULE Friday, Feb. 16 11 a.m. ET – Duke vs. Indiana 4 p.m. ET – George Mason vs. Coastal Carolina (ESPN+ / 105.5 FM Hank)

Saturday, Feb. 17 11 a.m. ET – George Mason vs. Duke 3 p.m. ET – Indiana vs. Coastal Carolina (ESPN+ / WRNN Hot Talk 99.5 FM)

Sunday, Feb. 18 11 a.m. ET – Indiana vs. George Mason 3 p.m. ET – Duke vs. Coastal Carolina (ESPN+ / 105.5 FM Hank)

ROTATION FOR COASTAL Friday, Feb. 16 CCU - RHP Riley Eikhoff (3-1, 4.43 ERA) vs. MASON - RHP Chad Gartland (7-2, 3.39 ERA)

Saturday, Feb. 17 CCU - RHP Alexander Meckley (N/A) vs. INDIANA - TBD

Sunday, Feb. 18 CCU - RHP Ryan Lynch (N/A) vs. DUKE - RHP Aidan Weaver (3-3, 4.86 ERA)

HALL OF FAMER • Coastal Carolina head coach Gary Gilmore is in his 29th and final season at the helm of the Chants' program. • Gilley enters the 2024 season with a total of 1,335 career wins over 34 seasons, which includes 1,082 wins as the head coach at CCU. • With his 1,335 career wins, Gilley ranks 22nd all-time in NCAA Division I and is fourth among all active NCAA Division I coaches.

BASEBALL AT THE BEACH • Coastal Carolina will open up the season with the annual Baseball at the Beach tournament. • This marks the 25th year that the Chants have hosted the Baseball at the Beach event, with the first coming all the way back in the 2000 season. • All three teams in this year's Baseball at the Beach field have competed in the annual event. Mason is 7-26 at Coastal on the diamond, while Indiana leads the all-time series 3-1 and Duke won the 2023 Conway Regional.

HOME. SWEET. HOME. • This season, Coastal is scheduled to play 34 home games versus teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference, ASUN, Big Ten, Big 12, Mid-American Conference, Colonial Athletic Association, Atlantic 10, Southern Conference and the Sun Belt Conference. • In fact, the Chants' first 20 games will come at home at "The Palace" to start the season. • Since 2000, the Chants have recorded 20 wins or more at home in all but four years, one of which was the shortened 2020 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic. • Since Coastal joined the Sun Belt Conference in 2017, the Chants have posted a record of 147-69-2 (67.4 percent) at home at Springs Brooks Stadium.

CHALLENGING 2024 SCHEDULE • CCU's 2024 schedule includes games versus teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big Ten, Big East, Conference USA, Atlantic 10, and the new look Sun Belt Conference. • The 2024 schedule will once again be a challenging one, as head coach Gary Gilmore's team will play 13 teams that made the 2023 NCAA Division I Baseball Championship Tournament last year in national seeds Wake Forest and Clemson, as well as NC State, North Carolina, Campbell, Southern Miss, Louisiana, George Mason, Duke, Ball State, Indiana, UNCW, and Troy.

FAMILIAR FACES • Overall, the Chants have 20 returning players from a year ago, 11 position players and nine pitchers, led by fifth-year Chant Graham Brown and returning starters Derek Bender, Zack Beach, , and Caden Bodine, as well as pitchers Riley Eikhoff, Will Smith, and Bryce Shaffer.

For complete coverage of CCU baseball, follow the Chants on social media @CoastalBaseball (Twitter), facebook.com/CCUChanticleers (Facebook), @GoCCUsports (Instagram), or visit the official home of Coastal Carolina Athletics at www.GoCCUsports.com.

From smokestacks to inland beach: Conway is one step closer to 'game changer' amenity

CONWAY, S.C. (WPDE) — The vision to create a new image of Conway and its position as the Gateway to the Grand Strand has passed a key procedural hurdle this week.Monday, the Santee Cooper Board of Directors voted to approve transferring roughly 800 acres of the old Grainger Generating Station site and Lake Busbee to the City of Conway.The end goal, a vision from the city's administrator - mayor, and council, will be connecting the old power plant site with the Conway Riverwalk and Marina. It would quadruple the amount of ...

CONWAY, S.C. (WPDE) — The vision to create a new image of Conway and its position as the Gateway to the Grand Strand has passed a key procedural hurdle this week.

Monday, the Santee Cooper Board of Directors voted to approve transferring roughly 800 acres of the old Grainger Generating Station site and Lake Busbee to the City of Conway.

The end goal, a vision from the city's administrator - mayor, and council, will be connecting the old power plant site with the Conway Riverwalk and Marina. It would quadruple the amount of boardwalk and create numerous trails to the city as well as a new inland beach.

"This will be an amazing project for the city of Conway and it will be a game changer going forward so we are really excited about it and I think from the feedback I got from Santee Cooper they are as excited as we are for it," said Adam Emrick with the city.

RELATED: From old coal plant pond to beach and boardwalk, what Conway sees in old SC Grainger site

Emrick discussed the plan in depth with ABC15 last Spring.

Since 2016, the Grainger Plant site has sat mostly vacant outside of some equipment and crewmember offices.

The two coal ash ponds have been monitored and treated. Emrick said state health regulators affirmed Coal Ash Pond 1, the closest waterbody to the Horry County Government Annex, as safe for public use. The second pond as well as Lake Busbee still carry environmental restrictive covenants prohibiting recreational use.

Utility officials support the transfer and will continue to monitor groundwater and wildlife restoration efforts. The city intends to enter into an agreement with the Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge to tend to Lake Busbee. The city also promises to allow the utility to monitor equipment at the ponds and permits its access to easements.

READ MORE: Life After Coal: 6 years of documenting & researching life that now calls Lake Busbee home

"We have rebuilt Lake Busbee, we rehabilitated it to its original marshland so it's really going to be great to be able to see it put to use," said Tracy Vreeland a local spokesperson for Santee Cooper.

As for the old plant site land and the dikes surrounding the pond, that's where the city's vision comes to life.

Once gifted and permitted, the city envisions a boardwalk that could span three or more miles around the pond with a mixed-use development and a new marina with a connection to the Waccamaw River.

The commercial endeavors would add hundreds of parking spots as well as an amphitheater to the old tennis court site with a trail connection between the riverwalk marina and the inland beach site.

City officials said the mixed-use commercial project would likely be a public-private partnership and more details would be developed when a full master plan is created by city staff.

For now, the conveyance still needs the approval of state leaders in the Joint Bond Review Committee. Utility officials anticipate they will look over the letter of intent from the city and the board of directors' agreement in late January.

Conway city officials believe if that approval comes, then the process will begin to develop a master plan.

New single-family homes could be coming to Conway. What we know now

A new development could bring more single-family homes to the Conway area.A 66-acre tract along Poplar Church Road in Conway, currently covered in trees, is expected to be developed into 100 single-family homes on half-acre lots after the original proposal to build more homes on smaller lots was withdrawn from the Horry County Planning Commission’s agenda for Thursday’s meeting, according to Diamond Shores Chief Operating Officer David Schwerd...

A new development could bring more single-family homes to the Conway area.

A 66-acre tract along Poplar Church Road in Conway, currently covered in trees, is expected to be developed into 100 single-family homes on half-acre lots after the original proposal to build more homes on smaller lots was withdrawn from the Horry County Planning Commission’s agenda for Thursday’s meeting, according to Diamond Shores Chief Operating Officer David Schwerd.

Diamond Shores, which is representing the property owner, is a Horry County-based real estate and land development company.

Michelle Christenson purchased the land for about $582,205 in 2021, according to Horry County Land Records. Christenson did not immediately return a request for comment.

The property’s market value is about $1.25 million, according to Horry County Land Records.

The planned development wasn’t what Diamond Shores initially intended. The original proposal called for 124 single-family homes on quarter-acre lots, which was on the Planning Commission’s 5:30 p.m. meeting agenda for Thursday.. That plan required the land to be rezoned from Forest Agriculture, which allows for low-density residential uses, to Multi-Residential One, which allows mixed-residential development in rural communities, according to Horry County’s zoning districts.

However, the proposal was withdrawn from the agenda before the commission’s meeting began. Schwerd said after the meeting the new plan for 100 single-family homes would be allowed under the property’s current zoning.

Schwerd added that the Planning Commission had deferred the plan twice, and the community surrounding the initially planned 124-home development was opposed to it, citing concerns of lost property value and traffic.

“People just don’t like development,” Schwerd said.

This story was originally published December 7, 2023, 10:22 PM.

Ben Morse is the Retail and Leisure Reporter for The Sun News. Morse covers local business, Coastal Carolina University and high school sports. Morse previously worked as an intern for The Island Packet covering local government. Morse graduated from American University in 2023 with a Bachelor’s Degree in journalism and economics, and he is originally from Prospect, Kentucky.

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